Burro Fire doubles in size to 1,000 acres; forest plans to close

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Burro Fire doubles in size to 1,000 acres; forest plans to close

Fire poses challenge in steep terrain, older stands of timber
Emily Rice/The Journal

The Burro Fire grew to about 1,000 acres Sunday, fueled mainly by ponderosa pine and fir.
Hand crews on Sunday focused their efforts near roads on the southern end of the fire, where the mixed conifer timber was more dense.
The footprint of the Burro Fire as of Sunday, June 10.
The steep, rugged terrain of the Bear Creek area has limited hand crews’ mobility.
Emily Rice/The Journal

Hotshot crews from Idaho, Montana, Colorado and Nevada are fighting the Burro Fire.
The Burro Fire grew to 1,000 acres on Sunday and is expected to grow as dry conditions continue.
Emily Rice/The Journal

Journal reporter Jim Mimiaga, right, talks with firefighters including incident commander Jeff Thumm, upper right, about the Burro Fire.
Incident Commander Jeff Thumm at the scene of the Burro Fire.
Emily Rice/The Journal

Chief Mountain, Montana, Hotshot Superinterndent Lyle St. Goddard on scene at the Burro Fire.
Emily Rice/The Journal

The Burro Fire grew to about 1,000 acres by Sunday afternoon in a remote area of the San Juan National Forest.
James Godwin, a Forest Technician with the San Jan National Forest, informs campers Saturday afternoon of road closures in the Transfer Park area. The forest has extensive closures due to the Burris Fire.
Emily Rice/The Journal

The Burro Fire grew to about 1,000 acres by Sunday afternoon in a remote area of the San Juan National Forest.
Emily Rice/The Journal

An aircraft flies over the Burro Fire on Sunday.
The Burro Fire sent up a huge plume of smoke and grew from a few acres to 30 acres in less than three hours.
Emily Rice/The Journal

The Burro Fire burns in a remote part of the San Juan Forest near Bear Creek.
Emily Rice/The Journal

A tree ignites during the Burro Fire.
The plume of smoke from the 416 Fire north of Hermosa, photographed Saturday from the Transfer Park area near Mancos.
Dolores District Ranger Derek Padilla closed Hillside Drive (Forest Service Road 436) Friday evening due to the nearby Burro Fire. The Bear Creek trail is also closed, as are other nearby roads and trails.
Smoke from the Burro and 416 fires, photographed in Dolores, Colorado. Satellite images from the National Weather Service indicate that the smoke may be forming pyrocumulus clouds.
Fire restrictions

Stage 2 fire restrictions are in place throughout Southwest Colorado.
Prohibited acts include:No campfires, including in developed campgrounds and recreation areas. No charcoal or coal barbecues or wood-burning stoves. Gas, pressurized cannister powered stoves with shut-off valves are allowed if they are at least 3 feet away from flammable material such as grass. No open burning, burn barrels or agricultural burns without prior approval. No smoking, except for in a building or vehicle. No welding, use of open-flame torches, pipe-fitting, or metal grinding without a fire-watch official present with proper mitigation tools. Oil and gas welding and cutting operations can be done only in an area with a radius of at least 20 feet from all flammable materials. No use of equipment with an internal combustion engine without a properly installed spark arresting device, including chain saws, ATVs and generators. No use of chain saws without a spark-arresting device and a readily accessible fire extinguisher and shovel. No explosives such as fireworks and tracer round bullets. Note that agencies such as the Forest Service may have different restrictions.San Juan National ForestNo traveling off marked roads, trails and parking areas in cars or off-road vehicles.Discharging a firearm, air rifle or gas gun is prohibited on all land in the San Juan National Forest.

Related Media
Burro Fire road closures
Burro Fire map, June 10

Burro Fire doubles in size to 1,000 acres; forest plans to close

Emily Rice/The Journal

The Burro Fire grew to about 1,000 acres Sunday, fueled mainly by ponderosa pine and fir.
Hand crews on Sunday focused their efforts near roads on the southern end of the fire, where the mixed conifer timber was more dense.
The footprint of the Burro Fire as of Sunday, June 10.
The steep, rugged terrain of the Bear Creek area has limited hand crews’ mobility.
Emily Rice/The Journal

Hotshot crews from Idaho, Montana, Colorado and Nevada are fighting the Burro Fire.
The Burro Fire grew to 1,000 acres on Sunday and is expected to grow as dry conditions continue.
Emily Rice/The Journal

Journal reporter Jim Mimiaga, right, talks with firefighters including incident commander Jeff Thumm, upper right, about the Burro Fire.
Incident Commander Jeff Thumm at the scene of the Burro Fire.
Emily Rice/The Journal

Chief Mountain, Montana, Hotshot Superinterndent Lyle St. Goddard on scene at the Burro Fire.
Emily Rice/The Journal

The Burro Fire grew to about 1,000 acres by Sunday afternoon in a remote area of the San Juan National Forest.
James Godwin, a Forest Technician with the San Jan National Forest, informs campers Saturday afternoon of road closures in the Transfer Park area. The forest has extensive closures due to the Burris Fire.
Emily Rice/The Journal

The Burro Fire grew to about 1,000 acres by Sunday afternoon in a remote area of the San Juan National Forest.
Emily Rice/The Journal

An aircraft flies over the Burro Fire on Sunday.
The Burro Fire sent up a huge plume of smoke and grew from a few acres to 30 acres in less than three hours.
Emily Rice/The Journal

The Burro Fire burns in a remote part of the San Juan Forest near Bear Creek.
Emily Rice/The Journal

A tree ignites during the Burro Fire.
The plume of smoke from the 416 Fire north of Hermosa, photographed Saturday from the Transfer Park area near Mancos.
Dolores District Ranger Derek Padilla closed Hillside Drive (Forest Service Road 436) Friday evening due to the nearby Burro Fire. The Bear Creek trail is also closed, as are other nearby roads and trails.
Smoke from the Burro and 416 fires, photographed in Dolores, Colorado. Satellite images from the National Weather Service indicate that the smoke may be forming pyrocumulus clouds.