Burro Fire reaches 100 acres amid air and ground attack

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Burro Fire reaches 100 acres amid air and ground attack

Air quality advisory issued in wake of Burro, 416 fires
The Burro Fire sent up a huge plume of smoke and grew from a few acres to 30 acres in less than three hours.
Jim Smith of Dolores submitted this photo of the Burro and 416 fires, as seen from his home near the McPhee Reservoir marina.
The Burro Fire is burning 5 miles up the Bear Creek trail. The La Plata Mountains are in the background.
Dolores District Ranger Derek Padilla closes Hillside Road (FS 436) Friday evening due to the nearby Burro Fire. The Bear Creek trail is also closed, as are other nearby roads and trails.
Crews are fighting the Burro Fire, about 23 miles northeast of Dolores, Colorado. The fire, photographed from just east of Cortez, appears as the smoke plume left of the 416 Fire plume.
Crews are on scene to fight the Burro Fire, about 23 miles northeast of Dolores, Colorado.
The Burro Fire, left, and the 416 Fire, right, as seen from the intersection of Colorado Highways 145 and 184 outside Dolores, Colorado.
The Burro Fire, about 23 miles northeast of Dolores, Colorado, is south of the Bear Creek trailhead at mile marker 34.
An aerial shot of the Burro Fire located 23 miles east of Dolores in the Bear Creek drainage.
Fire restrictions

Stage 2 fire restrictions are in place throughout Southwest Colorado.
Prohibited acts include:No campfires, including in developed campgrounds and recreation areas. No charcoal or coal barbecues or wood-burning stoves. Gas, pressurized cannister powered stoves with shut-off valves are allowed if they are at least 3 feet away from flammable material such as grass. No open burning, burn barrels or agricultural burns without prior approval. No smoking, except for in a building or vehicle. No welding, use of open-flame torches, pipe-fitting, or metal grinding without a fire-watch official present with proper mitigation tools. Oil and gas welding and cutting operations can be done only in an area with a radius of at least 20 feet from all flammable materials. No use of equipment with an internal combustion engine without a properly installed spark arresting device, including chain saws, ATVs and generators. No use of chain saws without a spark-arresting device and a readily accessible fire extinguisher and shovel. No explosives such as fireworks and tracer round bullets. Note that agencies such as the Forest Service may have different restrictions.San Juan National ForestNo traveling off marked roads, trails and parking areas in cars or off-road vehicles.Discharging a firearm, air rifle or gas gun is prohibited on all land in the San Juan National Forest.

Burro Fire reaches 100 acres amid air and ground attack

The Burro Fire sent up a huge plume of smoke and grew from a few acres to 30 acres in less than three hours.
Jim Smith of Dolores submitted this photo of the Burro and 416 fires, as seen from his home near the McPhee Reservoir marina.
The Burro Fire is burning 5 miles up the Bear Creek trail. The La Plata Mountains are in the background.
Dolores District Ranger Derek Padilla closes Hillside Road (FS 436) Friday evening due to the nearby Burro Fire. The Bear Creek trail is also closed, as are other nearby roads and trails.
Crews are fighting the Burro Fire, about 23 miles northeast of Dolores, Colorado. The fire, photographed from just east of Cortez, appears as the smoke plume left of the 416 Fire plume.
Crews are on scene to fight the Burro Fire, about 23 miles northeast of Dolores, Colorado.
The Burro Fire, left, and the 416 Fire, right, as seen from the intersection of Colorado Highways 145 and 184 outside Dolores, Colorado.
The Burro Fire, about 23 miles northeast of Dolores, Colorado, is south of the Bear Creek trailhead at mile marker 34.
An aerial shot of the Burro Fire located 23 miles east of Dolores in the Bear Creek drainage.