Scientists hope bug experiment fattens Colorado River fish

Scientists hope bug experiment fattens Colorado River fish

An experiment hopes to help fatten up Colorado River trout by helping insects
In this 2013 photo, river guide Steph Jackson holds an endangered humpback chub near the confluence of the Little Colorado and Colorado rivers in the Grand Canyon. Aquatic insects serve as food for fish, bats and birds in the Grand Canyon. Water has rushed through the Colorado River to help build sandbars in the Grand Canyon and provide spawning areas for native fish.
U.S. Geological Survey scientist Ted Kennedy sampling aquatic insects in the Grand Canyon in Arizona in 2014.
This undated photo shows an adult midge, about ¼ inch long,
In this 2013 photo, amateur scientists on a youth river trip check a light trap along the banks of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. Aquatic insects serve as food for fish, bats and birds in the Grand Canyon. Torrents of water have rushed through the Colorado River to help build up sandbars in the Grand Canyon, provide spawning areas for native fish and to protect archaeological sites.
In this 2013 photo, U.S. Geological Survey scientist Ted Kennedy takes aquatic samples in the Colorado River below Glen Canyon Dam in northern Arizona. Beginning Saturday, May 5, water will be low and steady to benefit bugs and the things that eat bugs, as the dam that holds back Lake Powell will decrease flows over the weekend to give bug eggs a better chance for survival.
This 2014 photo shows a damselfly nymph – about 1 inch long, collected from Hermit Creek, a tributary to the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon.

Scientists hope bug experiment fattens Colorado River fish

In this 2013 photo, river guide Steph Jackson holds an endangered humpback chub near the confluence of the Little Colorado and Colorado rivers in the Grand Canyon. Aquatic insects serve as food for fish, bats and birds in the Grand Canyon. Water has rushed through the Colorado River to help build sandbars in the Grand Canyon and provide spawning areas for native fish.
U.S. Geological Survey scientist Ted Kennedy sampling aquatic insects in the Grand Canyon in Arizona in 2014.
This undated photo shows an adult midge, about ¼ inch long,
In this 2013 photo, amateur scientists on a youth river trip check a light trap along the banks of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. Aquatic insects serve as food for fish, bats and birds in the Grand Canyon. Torrents of water have rushed through the Colorado River to help build up sandbars in the Grand Canyon, provide spawning areas for native fish and to protect archaeological sites.
In this 2013 photo, U.S. Geological Survey scientist Ted Kennedy takes aquatic samples in the Colorado River below Glen Canyon Dam in northern Arizona. Beginning Saturday, May 5, water will be low and steady to benefit bugs and the things that eat bugs, as the dam that holds back Lake Powell will decrease flows over the weekend to give bug eggs a better chance for survival.
This 2014 photo shows a damselfly nymph – about 1 inch long, collected from Hermit Creek, a tributary to the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon.
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