US says Myanmar makes life for Rohingya 'a death sentence'

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US says Myanmar makes life for Rohingya 'a death sentence'

In this Jan. 21, 2018 photo, Rohingya Muslim refugee Noor Kadir, 24, from the Myanmar village of Gu Dar Pyin, plays with his son inside the family makeshift shelter in Balukhali refugee camp, Bangladesh. The Associated Press has confirmed more than five previously unreported mass graves in the Myanmar village of Gu Dar Pyin through multiple interviews with more than two dozen survivors in Bangladesh refugee camps and through time-stamped cellphone videos. Survivors said that the soldiers carefully planned the Aug. 27 attack, and then deliberately tried to hide what they had done. They came to the slaughter armed not only with rifles, knives, rocket launchers and grenades, but also with shovels to dig pits and acid to burn away faces and hands so that the bodies could not be identified. Kadir and 14 others, all Rohingya Muslims in the Myanmar village of Gu Dar Pyin, had been choosing players for the soccer-like game of chinlone when the gunfire began. They scattered from what sounded like hard rain on a tin roof. By the time the Myanmar military stopped shooting, only Kadir and two teammates were left alive. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 18, 2017, file photo, Rohingya Muslims, who crossed over from Myanmar into Bangladesh, reach out for food distributed by aid agencies near the Balukhali refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Massacres, rapes and the wholesale destruction of villages by the Myanmar military in western Rakhine state have forced nearly 700,000 Rohingya Muslims to flee to Bangladesh, in reprisal for Rohingya militant attacks on Aug. 25. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
In this Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, photo, a volunteer measures the arm of a newly arrived Rohingya boy to check for malnutrition accompanied by his mother and brother upon their arrival at the Balukhali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. The lack of food the Rohingya faced at home is evident when they come to the Bangladesh camps, where new refugees, especially children and women, suffer from “unbelievable” levels of malnutrition, according to Dr. Ismail Mehr. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
In this Monday, Jan. 15, 2018, photo, newly arrived Rohingya refugee Mohammad Ilyas, 55, stands in a makeshift transit shelter at the Nayapara camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. "They are taking away our paddies, rice, and everything else, to keep us hungry. We were not able to leave our homes or go anywhere safely out of fear of the Buddhists," said Mohammad Ilyas, 55, who fled to Bangladesh, with only a shirt and a lungi sarong. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
In this Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, photo, a volunteer carries a malnourished child from a newly arrived Rohingya family to a transit camp in the Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. The hunger the Rohingya faced at home is evident when they come to the Bangladesh camps, where new refugees, especially children and women, suffer from “unbelievable” levels of malnutrition, according to Dr. Ismail Mehr. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
In this Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, photo, a newly arrived Rohingya woman makes rice for her family at Balukhali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

US says Myanmar makes life for Rohingya 'a death sentence'

In this Jan. 21, 2018 photo, Rohingya Muslim refugee Noor Kadir, 24, from the Myanmar village of Gu Dar Pyin, plays with his son inside the family makeshift shelter in Balukhali refugee camp, Bangladesh. The Associated Press has confirmed more than five previously unreported mass graves in the Myanmar village of Gu Dar Pyin through multiple interviews with more than two dozen survivors in Bangladesh refugee camps and through time-stamped cellphone videos. Survivors said that the soldiers carefully planned the Aug. 27 attack, and then deliberately tried to hide what they had done. They came to the slaughter armed not only with rifles, knives, rocket launchers and grenades, but also with shovels to dig pits and acid to burn away faces and hands so that the bodies could not be identified. Kadir and 14 others, all Rohingya Muslims in the Myanmar village of Gu Dar Pyin, had been choosing players for the soccer-like game of chinlone when the gunfire began. They scattered from what sounded like hard rain on a tin roof. By the time the Myanmar military stopped shooting, only Kadir and two teammates were left alive. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 18, 2017, file photo, Rohingya Muslims, who crossed over from Myanmar into Bangladesh, reach out for food distributed by aid agencies near the Balukhali refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Massacres, rapes and the wholesale destruction of villages by the Myanmar military in western Rakhine state have forced nearly 700,000 Rohingya Muslims to flee to Bangladesh, in reprisal for Rohingya militant attacks on Aug. 25. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
In this Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, photo, a volunteer measures the arm of a newly arrived Rohingya boy to check for malnutrition accompanied by his mother and brother upon their arrival at the Balukhali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. The lack of food the Rohingya faced at home is evident when they come to the Bangladesh camps, where new refugees, especially children and women, suffer from “unbelievable” levels of malnutrition, according to Dr. Ismail Mehr. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
In this Monday, Jan. 15, 2018, photo, newly arrived Rohingya refugee Mohammad Ilyas, 55, stands in a makeshift transit shelter at the Nayapara camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. "They are taking away our paddies, rice, and everything else, to keep us hungry. We were not able to leave our homes or go anywhere safely out of fear of the Buddhists," said Mohammad Ilyas, 55, who fled to Bangladesh, with only a shirt and a lungi sarong. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
In this Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, photo, a volunteer carries a malnourished child from a newly arrived Rohingya family to a transit camp in the Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. The hunger the Rohingya faced at home is evident when they come to the Bangladesh camps, where new refugees, especially children and women, suffer from “unbelievable” levels of malnutrition, according to Dr. Ismail Mehr. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
In this Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, photo, a newly arrived Rohingya woman makes rice for her family at Balukhali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
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