On earthquake anniversary, Haitians trying to rebuild

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On earthquake anniversary, Haitians trying to rebuild

In this Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018 photo, a bullhorn preacher evangelizes to the passing residents of the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Just before 5 p.m. on Jan. 12, 2010 a magnitude 7.0 earthquake upended life in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, killing more than 300,000 people by some estimates and destroying hundreds of thousands of homes. For many of those left homeless, life hasn’t yet returned to normal. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018 photo, Mona Leger, a 39-year-old charcoal vendor and mother of 6 stands outside her tent as she hands out labapen, or breadfruit in Creole, to her children, in the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Leger arrived at the camp in 2010, pregnant with her second child, her husband and their 4-year-old son. Leger, who earns a meager living selling charcoal, dares to dream the impossible, to one day afford to build a permanent home made of concrete. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
This Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018 photo shows clothes drying on rebar at the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. For many, the 8th anniversary of the Jan. 12, 2010 quake was made more painful by President Donald Trump’s reported remarks questioning why the U.S. would accept more people from Haiti and "shithole countries" in Africa rather than places like Norway. Trump denied using that language. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018 photo, street vendor Charler Dieufer, 37, plays his guitar while standing in front of his tent at the Caradeux refugee camp, set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Caradeux was meant to be a temporary home to 20,000 displaced people but has morphed into a crowded shantytown, the majority of them still living in tents. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Friday, Jan. 5, 2018 photo, a rooster stands in the middle of a construction site for a concrete home, in the Caradeux tent camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The United States granted Temporary Protected Status to Haitian immigrants after the disaster, a status the Trump administration is revoking after deciding that conditions in Haiti had improved enough to merit removal of the special protection. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018 photo, a woman sells goat meat in what has become the marketplace in the Caradeux tent camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Camp residents dream of one day returning to the modern comforts that were taken from them when a magnitude 7.0 earthquake struck just before 5 p.m. on Jan. 12, 2010. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018 photo, a woman walks past the home of Phaiton Mackenson's T-shelter surrounded by cinder blocks, the beginnings of a concrete home, in the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. “I am surrounding the shelter with cinderblock walls,” Mackenson says. “I stopped due to financial problems, but as soon as I have money from my work I will continue to build it because I want to get back to normal life.” (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018 photo, Timatant Paul, who was once a clothes vendor, sits on a stoop at the entrance of her tent to get a bit of fresh air, at the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Paul, who shares the tent with three children, says living in the camp makes her feel alone. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018 photo, construction workers build a concrete roof in the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Meant to be a temporary home the camp has morphed into a crowded shantytown where living in a concrete homes is seen as a return to normalcy. However the $7,000 price tag is out of reach for most of the displaced where half the Haitian population survives on less than $2 a day. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018 photo, seven-year-old Ducler Sarah Roudencia sharpens her pencil as she studies her school lesson, in the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Haitians reacted with outrage Friday to reports that President Donald Trump used a vulgar remark to describe the country on the eve of the anniversary of the 2010 earthquake, one of the deadliest disasters in modern history. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018 photo, children walk to the nearby school constructed inside the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The temporary camp has morphed into a crowded shantytown providing a school, police station, church, and voodoo temple, along with electricity and potable water. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018 photo, 12-year-old Lima Veronise styles the hair of customer Resita Gilles, in the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Lima, who is known for her hair styling skills, charges 750 gourdes or about $12.00 dollars per person. She uses her earnings to a help pay for her schooling. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018 photo, boys play a pickup game of soccer on a pitch carved out at the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The temporary camp has morphed into a crowded shantytown providing a school, police station, church, and voodoo temple, along with electricity and potable water. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018 photo, Mona Leger, 39, a charcoal vendor, looks for customers as she walks through the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Leger came to Caradeux after the quake pregnant with her second child, accompanied by her husband and their 4-year-old son. She is 39 now and has six children. Her husband sells chickens and she sells charcoal. Together, they earn about $150 a month and they dream of one day affording a home built of cinderblocks, which can cost about $7,000. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018 photo, residents watch soccer in a shelter that has evolved into a business where residents can charge their cellphones, or watch movies as well as soccer matches, in the Caradeux tent camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Promises of new permanent homes have failed to materialize and Haiti’s economy remains weak, leaving camp residents with nowhere to go. As a result, the camp is transforming into a village as people build cinderblock homes and try to create more normal lives. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Jan. 9, 2018 photo, Etienne Acine 38, a television and radio repairman, works on a television circuit board, in front of his T-shelter, in the Caradeux tent camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. “Living in the shelter makes me stressed because the shelter means Jan. 12, 2010 to me,” he says. “I want to live in a normal house like other people in the country.” (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018 photo, a street illuminates a section of the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The Jan. 12, 2010 magnitude 7.0 earthquake upended life in Port-au-Prince, killing more than 300,000 people by some estimates and destroying hundreds of thousands of homes. For many of those left homeless, life hasn’t yet returned to normal. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

On earthquake anniversary, Haitians trying to rebuild

In this Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018 photo, a bullhorn preacher evangelizes to the passing residents of the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Just before 5 p.m. on Jan. 12, 2010 a magnitude 7.0 earthquake upended life in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, killing more than 300,000 people by some estimates and destroying hundreds of thousands of homes. For many of those left homeless, life hasn’t yet returned to normal. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018 photo, Mona Leger, a 39-year-old charcoal vendor and mother of 6 stands outside her tent as she hands out labapen, or breadfruit in Creole, to her children, in the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Leger arrived at the camp in 2010, pregnant with her second child, her husband and their 4-year-old son. Leger, who earns a meager living selling charcoal, dares to dream the impossible, to one day afford to build a permanent home made of concrete. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
This Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018 photo shows clothes drying on rebar at the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. For many, the 8th anniversary of the Jan. 12, 2010 quake was made more painful by President Donald Trump’s reported remarks questioning why the U.S. would accept more people from Haiti and "shithole countries" in Africa rather than places like Norway. Trump denied using that language. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018 photo, street vendor Charler Dieufer, 37, plays his guitar while standing in front of his tent at the Caradeux refugee camp, set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Caradeux was meant to be a temporary home to 20,000 displaced people but has morphed into a crowded shantytown, the majority of them still living in tents. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Friday, Jan. 5, 2018 photo, a rooster stands in the middle of a construction site for a concrete home, in the Caradeux tent camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The United States granted Temporary Protected Status to Haitian immigrants after the disaster, a status the Trump administration is revoking after deciding that conditions in Haiti had improved enough to merit removal of the special protection. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018 photo, a woman sells goat meat in what has become the marketplace in the Caradeux tent camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Camp residents dream of one day returning to the modern comforts that were taken from them when a magnitude 7.0 earthquake struck just before 5 p.m. on Jan. 12, 2010. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018 photo, a woman walks past the home of Phaiton Mackenson's T-shelter surrounded by cinder blocks, the beginnings of a concrete home, in the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. “I am surrounding the shelter with cinderblock walls,” Mackenson says. “I stopped due to financial problems, but as soon as I have money from my work I will continue to build it because I want to get back to normal life.” (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018 photo, Timatant Paul, who was once a clothes vendor, sits on a stoop at the entrance of her tent to get a bit of fresh air, at the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Paul, who shares the tent with three children, says living in the camp makes her feel alone. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018 photo, construction workers build a concrete roof in the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Meant to be a temporary home the camp has morphed into a crowded shantytown where living in a concrete homes is seen as a return to normalcy. However the $7,000 price tag is out of reach for most of the displaced where half the Haitian population survives on less than $2 a day. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018 photo, seven-year-old Ducler Sarah Roudencia sharpens her pencil as she studies her school lesson, in the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Haitians reacted with outrage Friday to reports that President Donald Trump used a vulgar remark to describe the country on the eve of the anniversary of the 2010 earthquake, one of the deadliest disasters in modern history. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018 photo, children walk to the nearby school constructed inside the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The temporary camp has morphed into a crowded shantytown providing a school, police station, church, and voodoo temple, along with electricity and potable water. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018 photo, 12-year-old Lima Veronise styles the hair of customer Resita Gilles, in the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Lima, who is known for her hair styling skills, charges 750 gourdes or about $12.00 dollars per person. She uses her earnings to a help pay for her schooling. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018 photo, boys play a pickup game of soccer on a pitch carved out at the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The temporary camp has morphed into a crowded shantytown providing a school, police station, church, and voodoo temple, along with electricity and potable water. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018 photo, Mona Leger, 39, a charcoal vendor, looks for customers as she walks through the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Leger came to Caradeux after the quake pregnant with her second child, accompanied by her husband and their 4-year-old son. She is 39 now and has six children. Her husband sells chickens and she sells charcoal. Together, they earn about $150 a month and they dream of one day affording a home built of cinderblocks, which can cost about $7,000. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018 photo, residents watch soccer in a shelter that has evolved into a business where residents can charge their cellphones, or watch movies as well as soccer matches, in the Caradeux tent camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Promises of new permanent homes have failed to materialize and Haiti’s economy remains weak, leaving camp residents with nowhere to go. As a result, the camp is transforming into a village as people build cinderblock homes and try to create more normal lives. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Jan. 9, 2018 photo, Etienne Acine 38, a television and radio repairman, works on a television circuit board, in front of his T-shelter, in the Caradeux tent camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. “Living in the shelter makes me stressed because the shelter means Jan. 12, 2010 to me,” he says. “I want to live in a normal house like other people in the country.” (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018 photo, a street illuminates a section of the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The Jan. 12, 2010 magnitude 7.0 earthquake upended life in Port-au-Prince, killing more than 300,000 people by some estimates and destroying hundreds of thousands of homes. For many of those left homeless, life hasn’t yet returned to normal. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
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