Tribal coalition, environmentalists filing suits over monuments

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Tribal coalition, environmentalists filing suits over monuments

Groups file lawsuits, claiming presidential overreach
Protesters kneel in the middle of State Street police try to break up a march through downtown Salt Lake City on Monday, Dec. 4, 2017, in Salt Lake City. Roughly 3,000 demonstrators lined up near the State Capitol to protest President Donald Trump’s announcement of scaling back two sprawling national monuments, and his declaring that “public lands will once again be for public use.”
Anthony Fierro yells in front of a police officer as protesters are stopped from marching up State Street during President Donald Trump’s announcement to eliminate vast portions of Utah’s Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments in Salt Lake City, Utah, on Monday, Dec. 4.
Shaun Chapoose speaks during during a news conference, Monday, Dec. 4, in Salt Lake City. President Donald Trump traveled to Salt Lake City to announce plans to shrink two sprawling national monuments in Utah in a move that will delight the state’s GOP politicians and many rural residents who see the lands as prime examples of federal overreach, but will enrage tribes and environmentalist groups who vow to immediately sue to preserve the monuments. Chapoose with the Ute Tribe says Trump’s decision benefits “a few powerful Utah politicians.”
Protesters march from the Utah State Capitol through downtown Salt Lake City during President Donald Trump’s visit Monday, Dec. 4,. Roughly 3,000 demonstrators lined up near the State Capitol to protest Trump’s announcement of scaling back two sprawling national monuments, and his declaring that “public lands will once again be for public use.”
Protesters yell in front of police officers as they are stopped from marching up State Street during President Donald Trump’s announcement to eliminate vast portions of Utah’s Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments in Salt Lake City, Utah, on Monday, Dec. 4.
After they took over the intersection of 100S and State Street stopping traffic, the protesters kneel in solidarity during the protest against President Donald Trump during his visit to the State Capital in Salt Lake on Monday, Dec. 4.
An officer smells a flower that a protestor gave him after the protest downtown against President Donald Trump during his visit to the State Capital in Salt Lake on Monday, Dec. 4, 2017. Trump on Monday took the rare step of scaling back two sprawling national monuments in Utah, declaring that “public lands will once again be for public use” in a move cheered by Republican leaders who lobbied him to undo protections they considered overly broad.
Navajo Nation Vice President Jonathan Nez speaks during during a news conference Monday, Dec. 4, 2017, in Salt Lake City. President Donald Trump traveled to Salt Lake City to announce plans to shrink two sprawling national monuments in Utah in a move that will delight the state’s GOP politicians and many rural residents who see the lands as prime examples of federal overreach, but will enrage tribes and environmentalist groups who vow to immediately sue to preserve the monuments. Nez noted Monday that Trump’s move comes a week after he referred to a Democratic senator he doesn’t like as “Pocahontas.” He says the administration doesn’t respect indigenous people.
President Donald Trump hands a pen to Sen Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, after signing a proclamation to shrink the size of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase Escalante national monuments at the Utah State Capitol Monday, Dec. 4, 2017, in Salt Lake City.

Tribal coalition, environmentalists filing suits over monuments

Protesters kneel in the middle of State Street police try to break up a march through downtown Salt Lake City on Monday, Dec. 4, 2017, in Salt Lake City. Roughly 3,000 demonstrators lined up near the State Capitol to protest President Donald Trump’s announcement of scaling back two sprawling national monuments, and his declaring that “public lands will once again be for public use.”
Anthony Fierro yells in front of a police officer as protesters are stopped from marching up State Street during President Donald Trump’s announcement to eliminate vast portions of Utah’s Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments in Salt Lake City, Utah, on Monday, Dec. 4.
Shaun Chapoose speaks during during a news conference, Monday, Dec. 4, in Salt Lake City. President Donald Trump traveled to Salt Lake City to announce plans to shrink two sprawling national monuments in Utah in a move that will delight the state’s GOP politicians and many rural residents who see the lands as prime examples of federal overreach, but will enrage tribes and environmentalist groups who vow to immediately sue to preserve the monuments. Chapoose with the Ute Tribe says Trump’s decision benefits “a few powerful Utah politicians.”
Protesters march from the Utah State Capitol through downtown Salt Lake City during President Donald Trump’s visit Monday, Dec. 4,. Roughly 3,000 demonstrators lined up near the State Capitol to protest Trump’s announcement of scaling back two sprawling national monuments, and his declaring that “public lands will once again be for public use.”
Protesters yell in front of police officers as they are stopped from marching up State Street during President Donald Trump’s announcement to eliminate vast portions of Utah’s Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments in Salt Lake City, Utah, on Monday, Dec. 4.
After they took over the intersection of 100S and State Street stopping traffic, the protesters kneel in solidarity during the protest against President Donald Trump during his visit to the State Capital in Salt Lake on Monday, Dec. 4.
An officer smells a flower that a protestor gave him after the protest downtown against President Donald Trump during his visit to the State Capital in Salt Lake on Monday, Dec. 4, 2017. Trump on Monday took the rare step of scaling back two sprawling national monuments in Utah, declaring that “public lands will once again be for public use” in a move cheered by Republican leaders who lobbied him to undo protections they considered overly broad.
Navajo Nation Vice President Jonathan Nez speaks during during a news conference Monday, Dec. 4, 2017, in Salt Lake City. President Donald Trump traveled to Salt Lake City to announce plans to shrink two sprawling national monuments in Utah in a move that will delight the state’s GOP politicians and many rural residents who see the lands as prime examples of federal overreach, but will enrage tribes and environmentalist groups who vow to immediately sue to preserve the monuments. Nez noted Monday that Trump’s move comes a week after he referred to a Democratic senator he doesn’t like as “Pocahontas.” He says the administration doesn’t respect indigenous people.
President Donald Trump hands a pen to Sen Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, after signing a proclamation to shrink the size of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase Escalante national monuments at the Utah State Capitol Monday, Dec. 4, 2017, in Salt Lake City.
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