Deal bans predator-killing cyanide traps in Colorado

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Deal bans predator-killing cyanide traps in Colorado

Department of Agriculture says devices not used on public lands
Jordon Beesley/Idaho State Journal file

Canyon Mansfield holds the collar of his dog, Casey, who was killed March 16 by a cyanide-ejecting device placed on public land by federal workers to kill coyotes near his home in Pocatello, Idaho. The cyanide device, called an M-44, is spring-activated and shoots poison that is meant to kill predators.
This photo released by the Bannock County Sheriff’s Office shows a cyanide device in Pocatello, Idaho. The cyanide device, called M-44, is spring-activated and shoots poison that is meant to kill predators. Federal officials have agreed to stop using predator-killing cyanide traps on Colorado public lands amid pressure to ban the devices nationwide after one injured an Idaho teenager and killed his dog.

Deal bans predator-killing cyanide traps in Colorado

Jordon Beesley/Idaho State Journal file

Canyon Mansfield holds the collar of his dog, Casey, who was killed March 16 by a cyanide-ejecting device placed on public land by federal workers to kill coyotes near his home in Pocatello, Idaho. The cyanide device, called an M-44, is spring-activated and shoots poison that is meant to kill predators.
This photo released by the Bannock County Sheriff’s Office shows a cyanide device in Pocatello, Idaho. The cyanide device, called M-44, is spring-activated and shoots poison that is meant to kill predators. Federal officials have agreed to stop using predator-killing cyanide traps on Colorado public lands amid pressure to ban the devices nationwide after one injured an Idaho teenager and killed his dog.
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