Wild burros raft Grand Canyon rapids

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Wild burros raft Grand Canyon rapids

Hundreds airlifted by helicopter in historic Grand Canyon roundup
It took three or four cowboys to persuade a 400-pound wild burro to board a raft for a river ride down the Grand Canyon.
Courtesy photo

About 100 burros were floated out of the Grand Canyon specially designed rafts.
Courtesy photo

Horses were uncomfortable riding on the rafts during the round up.
Courtesy photo

Some burros were more resistant than others to leave their home in the Grand Canyon.
Courtesy photo

Two helicopters helped to herd wild burros toward cowboys, and also ferried rafts back upriver so they could pick up more burros. About 500 of the burros were transported one by one by helicopter out of the canyon. Ten reportedly died due to the stress of helicopter transport.
Courtesy photo

Burros are not native to the Grand Canyon, but established a wild population after being left behind when mines closed down in the early 1900s.
Courtesy photo

Specially designed rafts were fitted with corrals to transport the burros.
Courtesy photo

A cowboy and his captured burro. The black stripping on the burros had religious significance to some because it forms a cross, and a donkey carrying a king is referenced in the bible.
Courtesy photo

Old pontoon rafts were used to transport horses and burros during the burro roundup. The pontoon rafts were the same ones used in World War II to support bridges that were used to get military vehicles across rivers in Germany.
Courtesy photo

Professional guides piloted the rafts through medium sized rapids. The burros were dropped off at Diamond Creek, then transported by truck to a Texas ranch where they were put up for adoption and became pets or guard animals.
Courtesy photo

Where are we going? Wild burros take in the views on a Grand Canyon raft trip.

Wild burros raft Grand Canyon rapids

It took three or four cowboys to persuade a 400-pound wild burro to board a raft for a river ride down the Grand Canyon.
Courtesy photo

About 100 burros were floated out of the Grand Canyon specially designed rafts.
Courtesy photo

Horses were uncomfortable riding on the rafts during the round up.
Courtesy photo

Some burros were more resistant than others to leave their home in the Grand Canyon.
Courtesy photo

Two helicopters helped to herd wild burros toward cowboys, and also ferried rafts back upriver so they could pick up more burros. About 500 of the burros were transported one by one by helicopter out of the canyon. Ten reportedly died due to the stress of helicopter transport.
Courtesy photo

Burros are not native to the Grand Canyon, but established a wild population after being left behind when mines closed down in the early 1900s.
Courtesy photo

Specially designed rafts were fitted with corrals to transport the burros.
Courtesy photo

A cowboy and his captured burro. The black stripping on the burros had religious significance to some because it forms a cross, and a donkey carrying a king is referenced in the bible.
Courtesy photo

Old pontoon rafts were used to transport horses and burros during the burro roundup. The pontoon rafts were the same ones used in World War II to support bridges that were used to get military vehicles across rivers in Germany.
Courtesy photo

Professional guides piloted the rafts through medium sized rapids. The burros were dropped off at Diamond Creek, then transported by truck to a Texas ranch where they were put up for adoption and became pets or guard animals.
Courtesy photo

Where are we going? Wild burros take in the views on a Grand Canyon raft trip.
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