The soul of Bluff: Visionary Gene Foushee built, restored desert town

The soul of Bluff: Visionary Gene Foushee built, restored desert town

Visionary Gene Foushee was one of the first motel owners to see the tourist potential in Monument Valley. Before there were paved roads west of Bluff, he led four-wheel-drive vehicle tours into what is now a Navajo tribal park and one of the most iconic destinations in the Southwest.
United in their goals and in their more than 60 years of marriage, Gene and Mary Foushee passed away this summer within nine days of each other. Always helpful, always willing to aid others and to build and restore the Bluff community, Gene Foushee also mentored dozens of young Navajos, teaching them carpentry, plumbing and construction skills.
Gene Foushee saved the handsome, cut-sandstone Lemuel Redd House in Bluff. The house is now owned by Steve Simpson, and contractor Milan Munson of Blanding worked extensively on renovations. The Redd family’s livestock empire was once one of the largest in the West, with cattle and sheep grazing from Bluff to La Sal, Utah, and east to Norwood, Colorado, and over much of what is now Lone Mesa State Park.
Visionary Gene Foushee was one of the first motel owners to see the tourist potential in Monument Valley. Before there were paved roads west of Bluff, he led four-wheel-drive vehicle tours into what is now a Navajo tribal park and one of the most iconic destinations in the Southwest.
Generations of visitors to Bluff, Utah, have enjoyed the hospitality of the Recapture Lodge, built by Gene and Mary Foushee and now owned by Jim and Luanne Hook. The sign at the entrance says SLIDE SHOWS, which are still a part of evening educational entertainment.
Gene and Mary Foushee saw the possibilities for tourism in Bluff, Utah. which had once been an isolated Mormon settlement established by families who braved the Hole in the Rock Trail. Today, Bluff has a variety of festivals and events including an annual balloon rally in January.
Bluff, Utah, now has an arts festival and in a small park. Residents and visitors can enjoy sculptures by local artist Joe Pachak.
When other folks were ready to abandon Bluff, Utah, Gene Foushee patiently bought and repaired Bluff’s historic homes, sold them, and then fixed another one. This is the Al Scorup House, built by the famous rancher who came to own The Dugout Ranch.
Courtesy of Andrew Gulliford

Gene Foushee bought and restored numerous historic stone houses in Bluff, Utah. The Adams House required extensive work but is now a four-bedroom vacation rental available from the Recapture Lodge, which Foushee built from scratch in the 1950s.

The soul of Bluff: Visionary Gene Foushee built, restored desert town

Visionary Gene Foushee was one of the first motel owners to see the tourist potential in Monument Valley. Before there were paved roads west of Bluff, he led four-wheel-drive vehicle tours into what is now a Navajo tribal park and one of the most iconic destinations in the Southwest.
United in their goals and in their more than 60 years of marriage, Gene and Mary Foushee passed away this summer within nine days of each other. Always helpful, always willing to aid others and to build and restore the Bluff community, Gene Foushee also mentored dozens of young Navajos, teaching them carpentry, plumbing and construction skills.
Gene Foushee saved the handsome, cut-sandstone Lemuel Redd House in Bluff. The house is now owned by Steve Simpson, and contractor Milan Munson of Blanding worked extensively on renovations. The Redd family’s livestock empire was once one of the largest in the West, with cattle and sheep grazing from Bluff to La Sal, Utah, and east to Norwood, Colorado, and over much of what is now Lone Mesa State Park.
Visionary Gene Foushee was one of the first motel owners to see the tourist potential in Monument Valley. Before there were paved roads west of Bluff, he led four-wheel-drive vehicle tours into what is now a Navajo tribal park and one of the most iconic destinations in the Southwest.
Generations of visitors to Bluff, Utah, have enjoyed the hospitality of the Recapture Lodge, built by Gene and Mary Foushee and now owned by Jim and Luanne Hook. The sign at the entrance says SLIDE SHOWS, which are still a part of evening educational entertainment.
Gene and Mary Foushee saw the possibilities for tourism in Bluff, Utah. which had once been an isolated Mormon settlement established by families who braved the Hole in the Rock Trail. Today, Bluff has a variety of festivals and events including an annual balloon rally in January.
Bluff, Utah, now has an arts festival and in a small park. Residents and visitors can enjoy sculptures by local artist Joe Pachak.
When other folks were ready to abandon Bluff, Utah, Gene Foushee patiently bought and repaired Bluff’s historic homes, sold them, and then fixed another one. This is the Al Scorup House, built by the famous rancher who came to own The Dugout Ranch.
Courtesy of Andrew Gulliford

Gene Foushee bought and restored numerous historic stone houses in Bluff, Utah. The Adams House required extensive work but is now a four-bedroom vacation rental available from the Recapture Lodge, which Foushee built from scratch in the 1950s.
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