Secrets of the Saguache stone snakes: A remarkable mystery endures

Secrets of the Saguache stone snakes: A remarkable mystery endures

At the edge of the Sangre de Christo Mountains, the remarkable mystery of stone snakes endures
Along an entire hillside, variations of a stone wall or stone snake stretch in several directions. The stacked stones are granite weighing 175 pounds per cubic feet. Many of the larger stones may weigh as much as 300 pounds. Who placed them in this configuration and why remains unknown.
At the entrance to the private property known as the Snake Nest in Saguache County, Colorado, a handmade sign reads Snake Nest Private Protected Preserve. The owner is interested in conserving wildlife as well as archaeology.
The stacked rock snake flows in several directions across a south-facing hillside in the San Luis Valley and does not enclose any kind of meadow or paddock.
Along an entire hillside, variations of a stone wall or stone snake stretch in several directions. The stacked stones are granite weighing 175 pounds per cubic feet. Many of the larger stones may weigh as much as 300 pounds. Who placed them in this configuration and why remains unknown.
Stones placed behind the snake’s head form a circle or enclosure, possibly an offering area or altar, before the body of the snake begins to stretch out over a remarkable 327 yards.
Along an entire hillside, variations of a stone wall or stone snake stretch in several directions. The stacked stones are granite weighing 175 pounds per cubic feet. Many of the larger stones may weigh as much as 300 pounds. Who placed them in this configuration and why remains unknown.
From the northern edge of the San Luis Valley on the hill where the snake nest resides, the Sangre de Christo, or Blood of Christ, Mountains stretch far to the south.
At the very end of the snake’s tail, a dead tree trunk had wire around it placed for a coyote snare. Some scholars think the snake’s tail or rattle lines up with sunrise over the Sangre de Christo Mountains during the winter solstice on Dec. 21.
Retired U.S. Forest Service archaeological technician Ken Frye of Del Norte walks near a stone snake’s tail. Stacked stone and linear archaeological features abound in the San Luis Valley.

Secrets of the Saguache stone snakes: A remarkable mystery endures

Along an entire hillside, variations of a stone wall or stone snake stretch in several directions. The stacked stones are granite weighing 175 pounds per cubic feet. Many of the larger stones may weigh as much as 300 pounds. Who placed them in this configuration and why remains unknown.
At the entrance to the private property known as the Snake Nest in Saguache County, Colorado, a handmade sign reads Snake Nest Private Protected Preserve. The owner is interested in conserving wildlife as well as archaeology.
The stacked rock snake flows in several directions across a south-facing hillside in the San Luis Valley and does not enclose any kind of meadow or paddock.
Along an entire hillside, variations of a stone wall or stone snake stretch in several directions. The stacked stones are granite weighing 175 pounds per cubic feet. Many of the larger stones may weigh as much as 300 pounds. Who placed them in this configuration and why remains unknown.
Stones placed behind the snake’s head form a circle or enclosure, possibly an offering area or altar, before the body of the snake begins to stretch out over a remarkable 327 yards.
Along an entire hillside, variations of a stone wall or stone snake stretch in several directions. The stacked stones are granite weighing 175 pounds per cubic feet. Many of the larger stones may weigh as much as 300 pounds. Who placed them in this configuration and why remains unknown.
From the northern edge of the San Luis Valley on the hill where the snake nest resides, the Sangre de Christo, or Blood of Christ, Mountains stretch far to the south.
At the very end of the snake’s tail, a dead tree trunk had wire around it placed for a coyote snare. Some scholars think the snake’s tail or rattle lines up with sunrise over the Sangre de Christo Mountains during the winter solstice on Dec. 21.
Retired U.S. Forest Service archaeological technician Ken Frye of Del Norte walks near a stone snake’s tail. Stacked stone and linear archaeological features abound in the San Luis Valley.
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