US wildfire costs hit record $2.3 billion; season isn't over

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US wildfire costs hit record $2.3 billion; season isn't over

FILE- In this Sept. 5, 2017, file photo, a wildfire burns through residential areas near the mouth of Weber Canyon near Ogden, Utah. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is directing all land managers and park superintendents to be more aggressive in cutting down small trees and underbrush to prevent wildfires. In a memo on Tuesday, Sept. 12, Zinke said the Trump administration will take a new approach and work proactively to prevent fires “through aggressive and scientific fuels reduction management” to save lives, homes and wildlife habitat. (Benjamin Zack/Standard-Examiner via AP, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 2, 2017, photo, a crew with California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) battles "La Tuna" brushfire on the hillside in Burbank, Calif. With multiple intense hurricanes, a powerful earthquake, wildfires and deadly flooding from Houston to India it seems that nature recently has just gone nuts. Some of these disasters, like Friday’s earthquake in Mexico, are natural. Others may end up having a mix of natural and man-made ingredients after scientists examine them. Experts in risk and psychology said we look for patterns in overwhelming things like disasters. Sometimes there’s a pattern in chaos. Sometimes there isn’t.(Matt Hartman via AP)

US wildfire costs hit record $2.3 billion; season isn't over

FILE- In this Sept. 5, 2017, file photo, a wildfire burns through residential areas near the mouth of Weber Canyon near Ogden, Utah. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is directing all land managers and park superintendents to be more aggressive in cutting down small trees and underbrush to prevent wildfires. In a memo on Tuesday, Sept. 12, Zinke said the Trump administration will take a new approach and work proactively to prevent fires “through aggressive and scientific fuels reduction management” to save lives, homes and wildlife habitat. (Benjamin Zack/Standard-Examiner via AP, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 2, 2017, photo, a crew with California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) battles "La Tuna" brushfire on the hillside in Burbank, Calif. With multiple intense hurricanes, a powerful earthquake, wildfires and deadly flooding from Houston to India it seems that nature recently has just gone nuts. Some of these disasters, like Friday’s earthquake in Mexico, are natural. Others may end up having a mix of natural and man-made ingredients after scientists examine them. Experts in risk and psychology said we look for patterns in overwhelming things like disasters. Sometimes there’s a pattern in chaos. Sometimes there isn’t.(Matt Hartman via AP)
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