The unbelievable bee and its impact on food

The unbelievable bee and its impact on food

We are still learning about the life of the hive and the life of the planet
Brad Milligin holds up a full honey comb in 2014. He is a third-generation beekeeper, at Milligin Farms.
The deadly parasitic Varroa mite on the back of this honey bee is one of many insect pests that sugar esters may be useful in controlling. Sucrose octanoate, a sugar ester, can kill the mite without harming the bee. Nearly one out of four American honeybee colonies died this winter, but that’s not quite as bad as recent years.
A bee gathers pollen from a flower in this undated photo. A honeybee can fly as far as two miles in one journey, each trip lasting anywhere from 15 minutes to two hours.
Sam Green/Cortez Journal

Gary Milligin in front of the warehouse with stacks of bee hives in 2014.

The unbelievable bee and its impact on food

Brad Milligin holds up a full honey comb in 2014. He is a third-generation beekeeper, at Milligin Farms.
The deadly parasitic Varroa mite on the back of this honey bee is one of many insect pests that sugar esters may be useful in controlling. Sucrose octanoate, a sugar ester, can kill the mite without harming the bee. Nearly one out of four American honeybee colonies died this winter, but that’s not quite as bad as recent years.
A bee gathers pollen from a flower in this undated photo. A honeybee can fly as far as two miles in one journey, each trip lasting anywhere from 15 minutes to two hours.
Sam Green/Cortez Journal

Gary Milligin in front of the warehouse with stacks of bee hives in 2014.
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