Ancestral Puebloans used fire to communicate across vast distances

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Ancestral Puebloans used fire to communicate across vast distances

The fire tower at Chimney Rock National Monument, built in 1940 by the Civilian Conservation Corp, was torn down in 2010 because it interfered with viewing astronomical events connected to the site, such as the major lunar standstill. Under the tower’s foundation, archaeologists found a 1,000-year-old fire pit that may have been a piece of a vast communication system that linked ancestral Puebloan sites in the Southwest.
In 2007, a group of researchers duplicated an experiment performed in 1990 by Kathy Freeman,a high school student from Farmington. Using large mirrors researchers were able to signal to distant sites in the Southwest. Researchers believe Native Americans tribes could have used large fires to achieve similar results.
Carey Vacenti, assistant professor of sociology at Fort Lewis College and a member the Jicarilla Apache tribe, says that according to Native American oral histories fires were used to notify outlying settlements of Chaco Canyon that people from the south had arrived with goods to trade. Chaco flourished as a cultural center from the 800s to the 1100s.

Ancestral Puebloans used fire to communicate across vast distances

The fire tower at Chimney Rock National Monument, built in 1940 by the Civilian Conservation Corp, was torn down in 2010 because it interfered with viewing astronomical events connected to the site, such as the major lunar standstill. Under the tower’s foundation, archaeologists found a 1,000-year-old fire pit that may have been a piece of a vast communication system that linked ancestral Puebloan sites in the Southwest.
In 2007, a group of researchers duplicated an experiment performed in 1990 by Kathy Freeman,a high school student from Farmington. Using large mirrors researchers were able to signal to distant sites in the Southwest. Researchers believe Native Americans tribes could have used large fires to achieve similar results.
Carey Vacenti, assistant professor of sociology at Fort Lewis College and a member the Jicarilla Apache tribe, says that according to Native American oral histories fires were used to notify outlying settlements of Chaco Canyon that people from the south had arrived with goods to trade. Chaco flourished as a cultural center from the 800s to the 1100s.
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