American artifacts: Two Colorado collectors build museums to benefit local economies

American artifacts: Two Colorado collectors build museums to benefit local economies

U.S. Highway 40 was once the main route between Denver and Salt Lake City. The Wyman Living History Museum is on the highway. A big sign draws visitors. Admission is free, and staff and volunteers share their smiles and local knowledge with tourists.
This red Chevrolet El Camino pickup, missing one taillight, was the beginning of the trend to make pickup trucks more comfortable and fashionable.
The Wyman Living History Museum includes the old log country store from Pagoda and an unrestored caboose from David Moffat’s Denver & Salt Lake Railroad.
Sheepman Lou Wyman sold his flocks and decided to build a living history museum just east of Craig. Wyman is there every day, working with a dedicated team of volunteers to repair, repaint and spruce up the hundreds of items in the museum’s collections.
A red 1928 Sport Phaeton Dual Cowl Cadillac at the Rangely Automotive Museum greets visitors on the museum’s highly polished marble floor. Tourists can get close and personal with these rare cars. Despite its size, this Cadillac’s engine generated only 90 horsepower.
A 1929 black touring car epitomizes the Bud Striegel’s collection at the Rangely Automotive Museum. The owner prefers vintage handcrafted 1920s-’30s automobiles, true classic cars, to later models.
One of Lou Wyman’s most interesting museum artifacts is his very own 110,000 pound M-47 tank, which averaged three gallons per mile when it ran. He wants to restore the V-12 Cadillac engine.
In the 21st century, most automobiles and SUVs look the same, but a glance back at vintage cars produced by American manufacturers in the 1920s and 1930s shows a reliance on steel, chrome and unique grills and radiators, which made each car stand out.
Among the unique vehicles in Bud Striegel’s collection is this 1940 U.S. Army jeep built by Ford Motor Co. in Dearborn, Michigan, not by Willys in Toledo, Ohio.
The interior of the Wyman Living History Museum boasts a staggering number of eclectic items from rare catcher’s mitts to boats, sheep wagons, cars, tools and a 1960 mint-condition snub-nose cab-over Jeep pickup with only 15,000 miles on it.
A rare Pierce motorcycle greets visitors to the Rangely Automotive Museum in downtown Rangely. Founder Bud Striegel hopes the museum will bring tourists to northwest Colorado.
A rare convertible American-made Auburn Boattail coupe with a stunning two-tone paint job, seen only in the most prestigious of auto museums, is one of the many highlights of Bud Striegel’s collection in Rangely.
A sparkling blue and white Mercer is on display with a 1932 Ford Custom Roadster at the Rangely Automotive Museum. The museum is a gift to the community by local oil pipeline builder Bud Striegel.
A 1929, five-passenger powder blue La Salle, manufactured by Cadillac Motor Co., can be found between vintage highway and gasoline signs at the Rangely Automotive Museum

American artifacts: Two Colorado collectors build museums to benefit local economies

U.S. Highway 40 was once the main route between Denver and Salt Lake City. The Wyman Living History Museum is on the highway. A big sign draws visitors. Admission is free, and staff and volunteers share their smiles and local knowledge with tourists.
This red Chevrolet El Camino pickup, missing one taillight, was the beginning of the trend to make pickup trucks more comfortable and fashionable.
The Wyman Living History Museum includes the old log country store from Pagoda and an unrestored caboose from David Moffat’s Denver & Salt Lake Railroad.
Sheepman Lou Wyman sold his flocks and decided to build a living history museum just east of Craig. Wyman is there every day, working with a dedicated team of volunteers to repair, repaint and spruce up the hundreds of items in the museum’s collections.
A red 1928 Sport Phaeton Dual Cowl Cadillac at the Rangely Automotive Museum greets visitors on the museum’s highly polished marble floor. Tourists can get close and personal with these rare cars. Despite its size, this Cadillac’s engine generated only 90 horsepower.
A 1929 black touring car epitomizes the Bud Striegel’s collection at the Rangely Automotive Museum. The owner prefers vintage handcrafted 1920s-’30s automobiles, true classic cars, to later models.
One of Lou Wyman’s most interesting museum artifacts is his very own 110,000 pound M-47 tank, which averaged three gallons per mile when it ran. He wants to restore the V-12 Cadillac engine.
In the 21st century, most automobiles and SUVs look the same, but a glance back at vintage cars produced by American manufacturers in the 1920s and 1930s shows a reliance on steel, chrome and unique grills and radiators, which made each car stand out.
Among the unique vehicles in Bud Striegel’s collection is this 1940 U.S. Army jeep built by Ford Motor Co. in Dearborn, Michigan, not by Willys in Toledo, Ohio.
The interior of the Wyman Living History Museum boasts a staggering number of eclectic items from rare catcher’s mitts to boats, sheep wagons, cars, tools and a 1960 mint-condition snub-nose cab-over Jeep pickup with only 15,000 miles on it.
A rare Pierce motorcycle greets visitors to the Rangely Automotive Museum in downtown Rangely. Founder Bud Striegel hopes the museum will bring tourists to northwest Colorado.
A rare convertible American-made Auburn Boattail coupe with a stunning two-tone paint job, seen only in the most prestigious of auto museums, is one of the many highlights of Bud Striegel’s collection in Rangely.
A sparkling blue and white Mercer is on display with a 1932 Ford Custom Roadster at the Rangely Automotive Museum. The museum is a gift to the community by local oil pipeline builder Bud Striegel.
A 1929, five-passenger powder blue La Salle, manufactured by Cadillac Motor Co., can be found between vintage highway and gasoline signs at the Rangely Automotive Museum
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