Eating profits

Eating profits

Parks and Wildlife experiments with fences to keep deer, elk out of farmers’ sunflowers
Matt Hammond, district wildlife manager for Colorado Parks and Wildlife, discusses the use of Plantskydd blood powder to scare off wildlife in fields like the sunflowers behind. The red powder is in the plastic container he is holding. Hammond was addressing farmers during a field day Thursday at Colorado State University’s Southwestern Colorado Research Center at Yellow Jacket. Parks and Wildlife is experimenting with alternative fencing techniques to keep deer and elk out of sunflower crops.
Colorado Parks and Wildlife is experimenting with “winged” fencing to keep elk out of crops.

Eating profits

Matt Hammond, district wildlife manager for Colorado Parks and Wildlife, discusses the use of Plantskydd blood powder to scare off wildlife in fields like the sunflowers behind. The red powder is in the plastic container he is holding. Hammond was addressing farmers during a field day Thursday at Colorado State University’s Southwestern Colorado Research Center at Yellow Jacket. Parks and Wildlife is experimenting with alternative fencing techniques to keep deer and elk out of sunflower crops.
Colorado Parks and Wildlife is experimenting with “winged” fencing to keep elk out of crops.
Helicopter crew will catch elk

Colorado Parks and Wildlife plans to use a helicopter crew to put radio collars on deer and elk southwest of Dove Creek.
The radio collars, which transmit a signal used to track deer and elk, will help wildlife officials study herd movements, said Matt Hammond, district wildlife manager for Parks and Wildlife’s Dove Creek District.
Following the animals’ movements will help determine how they interact with Parks and Wildlife’s project to learn how different types of barriers, including electric fences and biological barriers, might keep deer and elk out of sunflower crops, he said.
Recording the ungulates also will help officials map the animals movements in the Dove Creek area and learn where elk go during hunting season, Hammond said. That could help Parks and Wildlife develop a hunting season to keep elk herd populations down enough for farmers to grow sunflowers.
A helicopter crew will attempt to capture 20 elk and 20 deer southwest of Dove Creek, along Squaw Point, around the end of September, Hammond said.

Reach Russell Smyth at 564-6030 or russells@cortezjournal.com.

Game damage

Colorado Parks and Wildlife pays farmers and ranchers for livestock and crop damages resulting from the state’s wildlife. Recent damages, reported by fiscal year, follow. Sunflower damages are for an area that generally covers western Montezuma and Dolores counties, and a portion of western San Miguel County.
FY 2010-’11 — No damages for sunflowers; that’s due to abundant natural forage for deer and elk.
FY 2009-’10 — $39,000 for sunflower claims; about $703,000 in game damage claims to all ag producers around Colorado.
FY 2008-’09 — About $240,000 for sunflower claims.
FY 2007-’08 — About $240,000 for sunflower claims.

Source: Colorado Parks and Wildlife

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