New FLC science and engineering building will ‘rocket us forward’

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New FLC science and engineering building will ‘rocket us forward’

Masons from Canyon Landscape, from left, Walker Rodham, Erik Lewis and Van Lancaster, build the Geologic Wall of Time in the new Geosciences, Physics and Engineering Hall at Fort Lewis College. The wall uses local rock to depict the layers of Durango outcrops ranging in age from 1.4 billion years to 16 million years.
The Foucault pendulum, installed near one of the main entrances to the new Geosciences, Physics and Engineering Hall at Fort Lewis College, shows the rotation of the Earth, although it appears that the pendulum is moving. The pendulum was sponsored by Grace Deltscheff on behalf of herself and her late husband, Gustav Deltscheff.
A bird’s-eye view of the Fluids Laboratory in the new Geosciences, Physics and Engineering Hall at Fort Lewis College shows the wind tunnel, rear, and a water flume, with clear piping so students can perform pressure experiments. Other labs will allow students to study optics, river morphology and geology, and paleontology.
The Constellation Sky, located at one of the main entrances to the new Geosciences, Physics and Engineering Hall at Fort Lewis College, features six major constellations – the Big and Little Dippers, Orion, the Pleiades, Scorpio and Cassiopeia. They are also significant in the belief systems and lore of regional Native American tribes. A monitor nearby will tell visitors about Native American lore as well as offering a look at what’s happening in real time in the building’s labs.
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The Fort Lewis College Department of Advancement continues to raise money for the Geosciences, Physics and Engineering Hall. Several naming opportunities remain, including the domed observatory and the main lecture hall. To learn more, call

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New FLC science and engineering building will ‘rocket us forward’

Masons from Canyon Landscape, from left, Walker Rodham, Erik Lewis and Van Lancaster, build the Geologic Wall of Time in the new Geosciences, Physics and Engineering Hall at Fort Lewis College. The wall uses local rock to depict the layers of Durango outcrops ranging in age from 1.4 billion years to 16 million years.
The Foucault pendulum, installed near one of the main entrances to the new Geosciences, Physics and Engineering Hall at Fort Lewis College, shows the rotation of the Earth, although it appears that the pendulum is moving. The pendulum was sponsored by Grace Deltscheff on behalf of herself and her late husband, Gustav Deltscheff.
A bird’s-eye view of the Fluids Laboratory in the new Geosciences, Physics and Engineering Hall at Fort Lewis College shows the wind tunnel, rear, and a water flume, with clear piping so students can perform pressure experiments. Other labs will allow students to study optics, river morphology and geology, and paleontology.
The Constellation Sky, located at one of the main entrances to the new Geosciences, Physics and Engineering Hall at Fort Lewis College, features six major constellations – the Big and Little Dippers, Orion, the Pleiades, Scorpio and Cassiopeia. They are also significant in the belief systems and lore of regional Native American tribes. A monitor nearby will tell visitors about Native American lore as well as offering a look at what’s happening in real time in the building’s labs.
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