Phantom Ranch: Mary Colter’s oasis in the Grand Canyon

Phantom Ranch: Mary Colter’s oasis in the Grand Canyon

Mary Colter worked for the Fred Harvey Co. of the Santa Fe Railroad to build tourist facilities on the Grand Canyon’s South Rim. Her work epitomized “parkitecture,” which was the philosophy to use local materials to blend buildings into the terrain – to fit into, not dominate, the landscape.
Mary Colter’s cabins at Phantom Ranch are a nine-mile hike or mule ride and a 5,000-foot drop from the South Rim on the Bright Angel Trail. Visitors love her cabins, which snugly blend into the canyon’s bottom. They are the only tourist lodging with concrete floors, beds and fireplaces for 277 miles near the Colorado River’s legendary rapids.
Mary Colter’s cabins at Phantom Ranch are a nine-mile hike or mule ride and a 5,000-foot drop from the South Rim on the Bright Angel Trail. Visitors love her cabins, which snugly blend into the canyon’s bottom. They are the only tourist lodging with concrete floors, beds and fireplaces for 277 miles near the Colorado River’s legendary rapids.
Mary Colter’s Phantom Ranch Canteen, or combination store and café, beckons travelers from around the world.
In the Phantom Ranch Canteen, hikers and visitors share dining room tables and swap stories about their adventures. Strangers soon become friends along the canyon’s many trails.
Mary Colter’s Phantom Ranch cabins look like they belong there. They fit into the landscape and are sought after by weary hikers.
Less than 1 percent of all those who visit the Grand Canyon see it from the bottom where the play of light on stone and canyon walls changes constantly.
This narrow bridge in the bottom of the Grand Canyon unites the North and South rims. It’s a delight to be on the bridge alone, but it’s no place to meet a fully loaded mule team carrying either passengers or supplies.
The 1928 walking bridge over the Colorado River stretches like a black line between canyon walls. Building the bridge was an engineering feat with mules packing in hundreds of yards of steel cable.
Writing postcards and letters home is a favorite pastime for visitors to Phantom Ranch. Mail goes out by mule train, and letters are posted in this leather mail pouch.
Each year the Grand Canyon draws more than 4 million tourists from around the world to stare into the abyss and to contemplate “deep time,” which is the age of the Earth.
On the South Rim of the Grand Canyon, Mary Colter’s cabins, each delightfully different, allow travelers to step out the door and walk just a few yards to the canyon’s rim.
Mary Colter’s Phantom Ranch cabins look like they belong there. They fit into the landscape and are sought after by weary hikers.

Phantom Ranch: Mary Colter’s oasis in the Grand Canyon

Mary Colter worked for the Fred Harvey Co. of the Santa Fe Railroad to build tourist facilities on the Grand Canyon’s South Rim. Her work epitomized “parkitecture,” which was the philosophy to use local materials to blend buildings into the terrain – to fit into, not dominate, the landscape.
Mary Colter’s cabins at Phantom Ranch are a nine-mile hike or mule ride and a 5,000-foot drop from the South Rim on the Bright Angel Trail. Visitors love her cabins, which snugly blend into the canyon’s bottom. They are the only tourist lodging with concrete floors, beds and fireplaces for 277 miles near the Colorado River’s legendary rapids.
Mary Colter’s cabins at Phantom Ranch are a nine-mile hike or mule ride and a 5,000-foot drop from the South Rim on the Bright Angel Trail. Visitors love her cabins, which snugly blend into the canyon’s bottom. They are the only tourist lodging with concrete floors, beds and fireplaces for 277 miles near the Colorado River’s legendary rapids.
Mary Colter’s Phantom Ranch Canteen, or combination store and café, beckons travelers from around the world.
In the Phantom Ranch Canteen, hikers and visitors share dining room tables and swap stories about their adventures. Strangers soon become friends along the canyon’s many trails.
Mary Colter’s Phantom Ranch cabins look like they belong there. They fit into the landscape and are sought after by weary hikers.
Less than 1 percent of all those who visit the Grand Canyon see it from the bottom where the play of light on stone and canyon walls changes constantly.
This narrow bridge in the bottom of the Grand Canyon unites the North and South rims. It’s a delight to be on the bridge alone, but it’s no place to meet a fully loaded mule team carrying either passengers or supplies.
The 1928 walking bridge over the Colorado River stretches like a black line between canyon walls. Building the bridge was an engineering feat with mules packing in hundreds of yards of steel cable.
Writing postcards and letters home is a favorite pastime for visitors to Phantom Ranch. Mail goes out by mule train, and letters are posted in this leather mail pouch.
Each year the Grand Canyon draws more than 4 million tourists from around the world to stare into the abyss and to contemplate “deep time,” which is the age of the Earth.
On the South Rim of the Grand Canyon, Mary Colter’s cabins, each delightfully different, allow travelers to step out the door and walk just a few yards to the canyon’s rim.
Mary Colter’s Phantom Ranch cabins look like they belong there. They fit into the landscape and are sought after by weary hikers.
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