Grand visions in the New Mexico desert

Grand visions in the New Mexico desert

The Elephant Butte Dam project celebrates its 100th anniversary this year. Irrigation water from Elephant Butte irrigates thousands of agricultural acres in southern New Mexico.
Artist Kate Halcey works with the Elephant Butte concessionaire to try to provide historic structures as artist-in-residencies. She is part of a wave of new residents to Truth or Consequences who love the starkness of the desert and the slower pace of life in New Mexico.
A bronze statue representing Civilian Conservation Corps workers stands in a small park above the Elephant Butte Dam. The CCC was one of the most successful of all of President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal programs, providing jobs and skill training for unemployed young men during the Great Depression.
Adobe-style tourist cabins above the lake, built by the CCC before World War II, are sought after by vacationing families, but the structures need repairs and maintenance.
A stained-glass representation of Elephant Butte Dam, rescued from an antique shop in El Paso, Texas, is now illuminated behind the bar at the Sierra Grande Hotel. Elephant Butte set the precedent for all subsequent Bureau of Reclamation projects, which provided irrigation and recreation across the American West.
Originally named Hot Springs, New Mexico, Truth or Consequences has numerous soaking pools and private mineral baths in the Hot Springs Historic District near the Rio Grande River.
The Elephant Butte Dam Site Marina has slips for 200 boats. The rock formation to the left of the photograph seems to resemble an elephant, hence the name. Elephant Butte set the precedent for all subsequent Bureau of Reclamation projects, which provided irrigation and recreation across the American West.
Media mogul and ardent conservationist Ted Turner has bought and restored the 1929 Sierra Grande Hotel. Visiting guests can also tour his vast New Mexican ranches, including the Armendaris at 360,000 acres and the Ladder Ranch at 156,000 acres.
A superb stained glass representation of Elephant Butte Dam, rescued from an antique shop in El Paso, Texas, is now illuminated behind the bar at the Sierra Grande Hotel.
In the quiet cove of Hospital Canyon, stone houses, which may once have been residences for nurses, are slowly undergoing stabilization and restoration, but much work needs to be done both inside and outside. Marina employees are dedicated to saving these structures, which represent some of the last of the original buildings at the dam site.
A CCC logo stands out on one of the adobe-style casitas just above the dam site marina. Many historic buildings have been demolished over the years, and others need repairs and renovation.

Grand visions in the New Mexico desert

The Elephant Butte Dam project celebrates its 100th anniversary this year. Irrigation water from Elephant Butte irrigates thousands of agricultural acres in southern New Mexico.
Artist Kate Halcey works with the Elephant Butte concessionaire to try to provide historic structures as artist-in-residencies. She is part of a wave of new residents to Truth or Consequences who love the starkness of the desert and the slower pace of life in New Mexico.
A bronze statue representing Civilian Conservation Corps workers stands in a small park above the Elephant Butte Dam. The CCC was one of the most successful of all of President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal programs, providing jobs and skill training for unemployed young men during the Great Depression.
Adobe-style tourist cabins above the lake, built by the CCC before World War II, are sought after by vacationing families, but the structures need repairs and maintenance.
A stained-glass representation of Elephant Butte Dam, rescued from an antique shop in El Paso, Texas, is now illuminated behind the bar at the Sierra Grande Hotel. Elephant Butte set the precedent for all subsequent Bureau of Reclamation projects, which provided irrigation and recreation across the American West.
Originally named Hot Springs, New Mexico, Truth or Consequences has numerous soaking pools and private mineral baths in the Hot Springs Historic District near the Rio Grande River.
The Elephant Butte Dam Site Marina has slips for 200 boats. The rock formation to the left of the photograph seems to resemble an elephant, hence the name. Elephant Butte set the precedent for all subsequent Bureau of Reclamation projects, which provided irrigation and recreation across the American West.
Media mogul and ardent conservationist Ted Turner has bought and restored the 1929 Sierra Grande Hotel. Visiting guests can also tour his vast New Mexican ranches, including the Armendaris at 360,000 acres and the Ladder Ranch at 156,000 acres.
A superb stained glass representation of Elephant Butte Dam, rescued from an antique shop in El Paso, Texas, is now illuminated behind the bar at the Sierra Grande Hotel.
In the quiet cove of Hospital Canyon, stone houses, which may once have been residences for nurses, are slowly undergoing stabilization and restoration, but much work needs to be done both inside and outside. Marina employees are dedicated to saving these structures, which represent some of the last of the original buildings at the dam site.
A CCC logo stands out on one of the adobe-style casitas just above the dam site marina. Many historic buildings have been demolished over the years, and others need repairs and renovation.
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