In Arizona, reptile poaching made easy

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In Arizona, reptile poaching made easy

Why some lucrative wildlife crimes are difficult to prosecute
Daniel Marchand, curator at the Phoenix Herpetological Society, introduces visitors to Fredrick, a Gila monster that was rescued from an apartment complex in Scottsdale, Arizona. The Phoenix Herpetological Society works with Arizona Game and Fish to confiscate illegally caught animals and give them temporary homes.
Dave Prival measures a twin-spotted rattlesnake as part of a research project that’s lasted 18 years. Poaching has reduced the population of the snakes he researches.
Daniel Marchand holds Fredrick the Gila monster, one of six or so at the Phoenix Herpetological Society. Many of them were confiscated from poachers and turned over to the organization to help educate the public.

In Arizona, reptile poaching made easy

Daniel Marchand, curator at the Phoenix Herpetological Society, introduces visitors to Fredrick, a Gila monster that was rescued from an apartment complex in Scottsdale, Arizona. The Phoenix Herpetological Society works with Arizona Game and Fish to confiscate illegally caught animals and give them temporary homes.
Dave Prival measures a twin-spotted rattlesnake as part of a research project that’s lasted 18 years. Poaching has reduced the population of the snakes he researches.
Daniel Marchand holds Fredrick the Gila monster, one of six or so at the Phoenix Herpetological Society. Many of them were confiscated from poachers and turned over to the organization to help educate the public.
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