Smokestacks come down: The end of an era in Page, Arizona

Smokestacks come down: The end of an era in Page, Arizona

For decades, a trio of concrete smokestacks signaled the Navajo Generating Station near Page, Ariz., a coal-fired power plant in northern Arizona. On Dec. 18, the stacks were taken down. The 775-foot stacks were the third largest human-made structures in the state.
On Dec. 18, the three smokestacks at the Navajo Generating Station in Page, Ariz., came down. They were as tall as a 77½ story building and were the third largest human-made structures in the state. For 45 years, they had spewed chemicals and carbon dioxide across Native American nations on the Colorado Plateau.
On Dec. 18, the three smokestacks at the Navajo Generating Station near Page, Ariz., came down. They were as tall as a 77½ story building and were the third largest human-made structures in the state. For 45 years, they had spewed chemicals and carbon dioxide across Native American nations on the Colorado Plateau.
The trio of concrete smokestacks at the Navajo Generating Station near Page, Ariz., were demolished Dec. 18. The towering stacks were the most visual reminders of the coal-fired power plant that operated for decades along the Arizona-Utah state line.

Smokestacks come down: The end of an era in Page, Arizona

For decades, a trio of concrete smokestacks signaled the Navajo Generating Station near Page, Ariz., a coal-fired power plant in northern Arizona. On Dec. 18, the stacks were taken down. The 775-foot stacks were the third largest human-made structures in the state.
On Dec. 18, the three smokestacks at the Navajo Generating Station in Page, Ariz., came down. They were as tall as a 77½ story building and were the third largest human-made structures in the state. For 45 years, they had spewed chemicals and carbon dioxide across Native American nations on the Colorado Plateau.
On Dec. 18, the three smokestacks at the Navajo Generating Station near Page, Ariz., came down. They were as tall as a 77½ story building and were the third largest human-made structures in the state. For 45 years, they had spewed chemicals and carbon dioxide across Native American nations on the Colorado Plateau.
The trio of concrete smokestacks at the Navajo Generating Station near Page, Ariz., were demolished Dec. 18. The towering stacks were the most visual reminders of the coal-fired power plant that operated for decades along the Arizona-Utah state line.
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