Making Ute history live The enduring legacy of Clifford Duncan

Making Ute history live The enduring legacy of Clifford Duncan

Above, in August 1997, Clifford Duncan and Betsy Chapoose of the Northern Ute Indian Tribe and Kenny Frost of the Southern Ute Indian Tribe participated in a Ute Culture Camp at Trappers Lake deep in the White River National Forest.
One of the most important sites to the Northern Utes is Trappers Lake on the White River National Forest east of Meeker. At a culture camp two decades ago, Clifford Duncan taught Ute culture, history and language.
Clifford Duncan not only understood all aspects of historic Ute landscapes and Ute use of the land, he also drew those landscapes as in this sketch of the Colorado high country.
Horses in Dominguez Canyon in the Dominguez-Escalante Canyon National Conservation Area represent some of the finest Ute petroglyphs.
Archaeologists from federal agencies often asked Clifford Duncan to consult on the meaning and interpretation of historic Ute rock art. This image of a man on a horse drawn with charcoal is in San Juan County, Utah.
This rare, historic Ute tree platform in Glenwood Canyon may have been used by a Ute shaman. A road was closed in the canyon to protect the site. Clifford Duncan consulted on the site’s historic and archaeological value.
Gas wells, like this one in Garfield County, cover the Rocky Mountain West. Native Americans such as Clifford Duncan have been invaluable in consulting on gas wells and long distance gas line placement to protect historic sites.

Making Ute history live The enduring legacy of Clifford Duncan

Above, in August 1997, Clifford Duncan and Betsy Chapoose of the Northern Ute Indian Tribe and Kenny Frost of the Southern Ute Indian Tribe participated in a Ute Culture Camp at Trappers Lake deep in the White River National Forest.
One of the most important sites to the Northern Utes is Trappers Lake on the White River National Forest east of Meeker. At a culture camp two decades ago, Clifford Duncan taught Ute culture, history and language.
Clifford Duncan not only understood all aspects of historic Ute landscapes and Ute use of the land, he also drew those landscapes as in this sketch of the Colorado high country.
Horses in Dominguez Canyon in the Dominguez-Escalante Canyon National Conservation Area represent some of the finest Ute petroglyphs.
Archaeologists from federal agencies often asked Clifford Duncan to consult on the meaning and interpretation of historic Ute rock art. This image of a man on a horse drawn with charcoal is in San Juan County, Utah.
This rare, historic Ute tree platform in Glenwood Canyon may have been used by a Ute shaman. A road was closed in the canyon to protect the site. Clifford Duncan consulted on the site’s historic and archaeological value.
Gas wells, like this one in Garfield County, cover the Rocky Mountain West. Native Americans such as Clifford Duncan have been invaluable in consulting on gas wells and long distance gas line placement to protect historic sites.
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