Black churches mobilizing voters despite virus challenges

Black churches mobilizing voters despite virus challenges

Black churches’ get-out-the-vote campaign looks different in 2020
A woman and child walk past Laurae Caruth, right, volunteer with Christian Cultural Center Social Justice Initiative’s voter registration drive, as she sits at a table where she registers voters Sept. 18 in the Brooklyn borough of New York.
New York City Council member Farah Louis, right, who works as a volunteer with Christian Cultural Center’s Social Justice Initiative’s voter registration drive, tries to convince a woman to register at a table outside the church Oct. 1 in the Brooklyn borough of New York.
Attorney Keith White, a director of social justice initiatives at Christian Cultural Center, stands next to a bus the church plans to update with COVID-19 protocols to transport people to the polls on Election Dayin the Brooklyn borough of New York.
New Mount Calvary Baptist Church members Marles Cooper, right, and Deacon Will, left, visit with DuWayne Evans who rode up on his bicycle and picked up a piece of pie from the church food shelf Oct. 1in North Minneapolis.
Volunteers work outside the gates of the Christian Cultural Center, a predominantly Black church, registering new voters Sept. 18 in New York. In recent election cycles, predominantly Black congregations across the country have launched get-out-the-vote campaigns commonly referred to as “souls to the polls.” But instead of packing buses and vans to shuttle people to early voting sites this year, church leaders say they are organizing caravans for absentee ballot drop-offs and in-person early voting.

Black churches mobilizing voters despite virus challenges

A woman and child walk past Laurae Caruth, right, volunteer with Christian Cultural Center Social Justice Initiative’s voter registration drive, as she sits at a table where she registers voters Sept. 18 in the Brooklyn borough of New York.
New York City Council member Farah Louis, right, who works as a volunteer with Christian Cultural Center’s Social Justice Initiative’s voter registration drive, tries to convince a woman to register at a table outside the church Oct. 1 in the Brooklyn borough of New York.
Attorney Keith White, a director of social justice initiatives at Christian Cultural Center, stands next to a bus the church plans to update with COVID-19 protocols to transport people to the polls on Election Dayin the Brooklyn borough of New York.
New Mount Calvary Baptist Church members Marles Cooper, right, and Deacon Will, left, visit with DuWayne Evans who rode up on his bicycle and picked up a piece of pie from the church food shelf Oct. 1in North Minneapolis.
Volunteers work outside the gates of the Christian Cultural Center, a predominantly Black church, registering new voters Sept. 18 in New York. In recent election cycles, predominantly Black congregations across the country have launched get-out-the-vote campaigns commonly referred to as “souls to the polls.” But instead of packing buses and vans to shuttle people to early voting sites this year, church leaders say they are organizing caravans for absentee ballot drop-offs and in-person early voting.
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