Ancient colors shine at FLC exhibit

Ancient colors shine at FLC exhibit

Rio Grande’s artistic history preserved through textiles
Jeanne Brako, the Center of Southwest Studies curator of collections, describes a loom on display in the exhibit called “Beauty and Necessity: Rio Grande Textiles from the Durango Collection” at the Center of Southwest Studies at Fort Lewis College.
This textile features the serrated or jagged diamond design typical of early-day weaving. Rio Grande textiles, showing Native American influence, featured diamonds with right-angle step-terrace construction. Diamond designs often were used on either side of the neck opening in a sarape, a long blanket-like shawl.
Jack Townes, with Skycraft Designs, works on a graphic panel that will describe the emergence of sheep in the Rio Grande River corridor between Albuquerque and Southwest Colorado. In the background is a reproduced sketch showing an indigenous woman weaving on a loom. The textiles in the exhibit date from 1860 to 1920.
Jeanne Brako, left, curator of collections at the Center of Southwest Studies, Peggy Morris, a staff volunteer, and Joe Helzer, an intern, hang a “Colcha” embroidery. The 20-piece display represents premier examples of Rio Grande textiles, part of the center’s larger 300-piece Durango Collection.

Ancient colors shine at FLC exhibit

Jeanne Brako, the Center of Southwest Studies curator of collections, describes a loom on display in the exhibit called “Beauty and Necessity: Rio Grande Textiles from the Durango Collection” at the Center of Southwest Studies at Fort Lewis College.
This textile features the serrated or jagged diamond design typical of early-day weaving. Rio Grande textiles, showing Native American influence, featured diamonds with right-angle step-terrace construction. Diamond designs often were used on either side of the neck opening in a sarape, a long blanket-like shawl.
Jack Townes, with Skycraft Designs, works on a graphic panel that will describe the emergence of sheep in the Rio Grande River corridor between Albuquerque and Southwest Colorado. In the background is a reproduced sketch showing an indigenous woman weaving on a loom. The textiles in the exhibit date from 1860 to 1920.
Jeanne Brako, left, curator of collections at the Center of Southwest Studies, Peggy Morris, a staff volunteer, and Joe Helzer, an intern, hang a “Colcha” embroidery. The 20-piece display represents premier examples of Rio Grande textiles, part of the center’s larger 300-piece Durango Collection.
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