Ancient colors shine at FLC exhibit

Ancient colors shine at FLC exhibit

Rio Grande’s artistic history preserved through textiles
Ar 140429993
Ar 140429993
Jeanne Brako, the Center of Southwest Studies curator of collections, describes a loom on display in the exhibit called “Beauty and Necessity: Rio Grande Textiles from the Durango Collection” at the Center of Southwest Studies at Fort Lewis College.
Ep 140429993
Ep 140429993
This textile features the serrated or jagged diamond design typical of early-day weaving. Rio Grande textiles, showing Native American influence, featured diamonds with right-angle step-terrace construction. Diamond designs often were used on either side of the neck opening in a sarape, a long blanket-like shawl.
Ep 140429993
Ep 140429993
Jack Townes, with Skycraft Designs, works on a graphic panel that will describe the emergence of sheep in the Rio Grande River corridor between Albuquerque and Southwest Colorado. In the background is a reproduced sketch showing an indigenous woman weaving on a loom. The textiles in the exhibit date from 1860 to 1920.
Ep 140429993
Ep 140429993
Jeanne Brako, left, curator of collections at the Center of Southwest Studies, Peggy Morris, a staff volunteer, and Joe Helzer, an intern, hang a “Colcha” embroidery. The 20-piece display represents premier examples of Rio Grande textiles, part of the center’s larger 300-piece Durango Collection.
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