Blood and struggle in Ludlow

Blood and struggle in Ludlow

100 years ago, coal miners rebelled against dangerous working conditions
On April 20, 1914, in Ludlow, the Colorado National Guard shot striking miners with machine guns, killing 17 of them, and then burned the miners’ tent colony to the ground, suffocating 11 women and two children. This photograph shows the remains of the tent camp in Las Animas County north of Trinidad.
An immigrant woman, possibly Italian, stands beside her tent as deep snow covers the ground in Las Animas County. Immigrant miners in Ludlow sought better safety, working and living conditions with their strike against Colorado Fuel & Iron Co. of Pueblo owned by John D. Rockefeller.
The United Mine Workers of America erected this marble statue at the Ludlow Massacre site. The Ludlow strike and subsequent deaths of miners, women and children brought national attention to the plight of labor in America before World War I.
A funeral procession for Ludlow victims leaves the Catholic church in Trinidad. Contributions poured in from across the nation from laboring men and women for the funerals of miners and their families who died at Ludlow.
Miners and their families in the Ludlow tent colony endured a bitterly cold winter in 1913-14.
The wives of striking coal miners and their children stand outside their tent at the Ludlow tent colony, which would become a massacre site. Historical archaeology has revealed much about camp life and how immigrants dug shelters under their tents for storage and for safety.
The Ludlow site has a few abandoned buildings, such as this one photographed in 1997 along the railroad tracks, but almost nothing else remains there.

Blood and struggle in Ludlow

On April 20, 1914, in Ludlow, the Colorado National Guard shot striking miners with machine guns, killing 17 of them, and then burned the miners’ tent colony to the ground, suffocating 11 women and two children. This photograph shows the remains of the tent camp in Las Animas County north of Trinidad.
An immigrant woman, possibly Italian, stands beside her tent as deep snow covers the ground in Las Animas County. Immigrant miners in Ludlow sought better safety, working and living conditions with their strike against Colorado Fuel & Iron Co. of Pueblo owned by John D. Rockefeller.
The United Mine Workers of America erected this marble statue at the Ludlow Massacre site. The Ludlow strike and subsequent deaths of miners, women and children brought national attention to the plight of labor in America before World War I.
A funeral procession for Ludlow victims leaves the Catholic church in Trinidad. Contributions poured in from across the nation from laboring men and women for the funerals of miners and their families who died at Ludlow.
Miners and their families in the Ludlow tent colony endured a bitterly cold winter in 1913-14.
The wives of striking coal miners and their children stand outside their tent at the Ludlow tent colony, which would become a massacre site. Historical archaeology has revealed much about camp life and how immigrants dug shelters under their tents for storage and for safety.
The Ludlow site has a few abandoned buildings, such as this one photographed in 1997 along the railroad tracks, but almost nothing else remains there.
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