Trick-or-What? Pandemic Halloween is a mixed bag all around

News

Trick-or-What? Pandemic Halloween is a mixed bag all around

FILE - Revelers march during the Greenwich Village Halloween Parade in New York on Oct. 31, 2019. The holiday so many look forward to each year is going to look different in the pandemic as parents and the people who provide Halloween fun navigate a myriad of restrictions and safety concerns. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
FILE - This Oct. 18, 2013 photo shows the entrance to the Horseman's Hollow Halloween attraction in Sleepy Hollow, N.Y. This Halloween is going to be vastly different for many. An association for haunted attractions estimates half among 800 or so of its members won't open. Parents and governments are weighing whether door-to-door trick-or-treating can safely happen. (AP Photo/Jim Fitzgerald, File)
This Aug. 23, 2020 photo released by Jamie Bender shows Bender with her husband David Terry, right, and their children Miranda, 3, left, and Matthew, 5. This year Halloween is going to look different in the pandemic as parents and the people who provide Halloween fun navigate a myriad of restrictions and safety concerns. “If our neighbors are wearing masks when they open the door, we would let the kids trick-or-treat a few houses then do the obligatory wipe-down of candy wrappers," Bender said. (Jamie Bender via AP)
FILE - Leonardo Urena of Napa, Calif., reacts after learning his pumpkin weighed in at 2,175 lbs., a new California weight record on Oct. 14, 2019, in Half Moon Bay, Calif. The Half Moon Bay Art & Pumpkin Festival, now canceled, usually draws up to 300,000 people from around the world. The kick-off event the week before, the World Championship Giant Pumpkin Weigh-Off, will carry on with no public spectators but plenty of humongous orange contestants as the judging goes virtual. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
This 2017 photo released by Charles Fremont shows a home decorated for Halloween in Webster Groves, Mo. On a typical Halloween in the St. Louis suburb, neighbors go all out to decorate their houses and yards with spooky skeletons, tombstones and jack-o'-lanterns as up to 1,000 people pack the blocked-off street to carry on an old tradition: Tell a joke, get a treat. This Halloween is going to be vastly different for many. Parents and governments are weighing whether door-to-door trick-or-treating can safely happen. (Charles Fremont via AP)
FILE - In this Oct. 31, 2018, file photo, zombie sisters maneuver their way down Santa Monica Boulevard in West Hollywood, Calif., during the West Hollywood Carnaval and Halloween Parade. The holiday so many look forward to each year is going to look different in the pandemic as parents and the people who provide Halloween fun navigate a myriad of restrictions and safety concerns. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)
This mage released by Zolli Candy shows 15-year-old candy entrepreneur Alina Morse posing next to a decorated tree for Halloween. The family holiday so many look forward to each year is going to look different in the pandemic as parents and the people who provide Halloween fun navigate a myriad of restrictions and safety concerns. Morse suggests fashioning a Halloween candy tree decorated with lights and treats so kids can pluck their own from a porch or yard. (Klint Briney/Zolli Candy via AP)

Trick-or-What? Pandemic Halloween is a mixed bag all around

FILE - Revelers march during the Greenwich Village Halloween Parade in New York on Oct. 31, 2019. The holiday so many look forward to each year is going to look different in the pandemic as parents and the people who provide Halloween fun navigate a myriad of restrictions and safety concerns. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
FILE - This Oct. 18, 2013 photo shows the entrance to the Horseman's Hollow Halloween attraction in Sleepy Hollow, N.Y. This Halloween is going to be vastly different for many. An association for haunted attractions estimates half among 800 or so of its members won't open. Parents and governments are weighing whether door-to-door trick-or-treating can safely happen. (AP Photo/Jim Fitzgerald, File)
This Aug. 23, 2020 photo released by Jamie Bender shows Bender with her husband David Terry, right, and their children Miranda, 3, left, and Matthew, 5. This year Halloween is going to look different in the pandemic as parents and the people who provide Halloween fun navigate a myriad of restrictions and safety concerns. “If our neighbors are wearing masks when they open the door, we would let the kids trick-or-treat a few houses then do the obligatory wipe-down of candy wrappers," Bender said. (Jamie Bender via AP)
FILE - Leonardo Urena of Napa, Calif., reacts after learning his pumpkin weighed in at 2,175 lbs., a new California weight record on Oct. 14, 2019, in Half Moon Bay, Calif. The Half Moon Bay Art & Pumpkin Festival, now canceled, usually draws up to 300,000 people from around the world. The kick-off event the week before, the World Championship Giant Pumpkin Weigh-Off, will carry on with no public spectators but plenty of humongous orange contestants as the judging goes virtual. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
This 2017 photo released by Charles Fremont shows a home decorated for Halloween in Webster Groves, Mo. On a typical Halloween in the St. Louis suburb, neighbors go all out to decorate their houses and yards with spooky skeletons, tombstones and jack-o'-lanterns as up to 1,000 people pack the blocked-off street to carry on an old tradition: Tell a joke, get a treat. This Halloween is going to be vastly different for many. Parents and governments are weighing whether door-to-door trick-or-treating can safely happen. (Charles Fremont via AP)
FILE - In this Oct. 31, 2018, file photo, zombie sisters maneuver their way down Santa Monica Boulevard in West Hollywood, Calif., during the West Hollywood Carnaval and Halloween Parade. The holiday so many look forward to each year is going to look different in the pandemic as parents and the people who provide Halloween fun navigate a myriad of restrictions and safety concerns. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)
This mage released by Zolli Candy shows 15-year-old candy entrepreneur Alina Morse posing next to a decorated tree for Halloween. The family holiday so many look forward to each year is going to look different in the pandemic as parents and the people who provide Halloween fun navigate a myriad of restrictions and safety concerns. Morse suggests fashioning a Halloween candy tree decorated with lights and treats so kids can pluck their own from a porch or yard. (Klint Briney/Zolli Candy via AP)
click here to add your event
Area Events