World isn't meeting biodiversity goals, UN report finds

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World isn't meeting biodiversity goals, UN report finds

FILE - In this Sept. 6, 2017 photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), fish swim in a reef at Pearl and Hermes Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. A decade-long effort by the world to save the world’s disappearing species and declining ecosystems has mostly failed so far, with fragile ecosystems like coral reefs and tropical forests in even more trouble than ever, according to a United Nations biodiversity report released on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020. (Jacob Asher/NOAA via AP)
FILE - This Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2020 photo provided by the French Army shows oil leaking from the MV Wakashio, a bulk carrier ship that ran aground on a coral reef off the southeast coast of Mauritius. A decade-long effort by the world to save the world’s disappearing species and declining ecosystems has mostly failed so far, with fragile ecosystems like coral reefs and tropical forests in even more trouble than ever, according to a United Nations biodiversity report released on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020. (Gwendoline Defente/EMAE via AP)
FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2019 file photo, a section of Amazon rainforest stands next to soy fields in Belterra, Para state, Brazil. A decade-long effort by the world to save the world’s disappearing species and declining ecosystems has mostly failed so far, with fragile ecosystems like coral reefs and tropical forests in even more trouble than ever, according to a United Nations biodiversity report released on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
FILE - In this Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019 file photo, smoke rises from a rainforest in Altamira, Para state, Brazil. A decade-long effort by the world to save the world’s disappearing species and declining ecosystems has mostly failed so far, with fragile ecosystems like coral reefs and tropical forests in even more trouble than ever, according to a United Nations biodiversity report released on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

World isn't meeting biodiversity goals, UN report finds

FILE - In this Sept. 6, 2017 photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), fish swim in a reef at Pearl and Hermes Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. A decade-long effort by the world to save the world’s disappearing species and declining ecosystems has mostly failed so far, with fragile ecosystems like coral reefs and tropical forests in even more trouble than ever, according to a United Nations biodiversity report released on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020. (Jacob Asher/NOAA via AP)
FILE - This Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2020 photo provided by the French Army shows oil leaking from the MV Wakashio, a bulk carrier ship that ran aground on a coral reef off the southeast coast of Mauritius. A decade-long effort by the world to save the world’s disappearing species and declining ecosystems has mostly failed so far, with fragile ecosystems like coral reefs and tropical forests in even more trouble than ever, according to a United Nations biodiversity report released on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020. (Gwendoline Defente/EMAE via AP)
FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2019 file photo, a section of Amazon rainforest stands next to soy fields in Belterra, Para state, Brazil. A decade-long effort by the world to save the world’s disappearing species and declining ecosystems has mostly failed so far, with fragile ecosystems like coral reefs and tropical forests in even more trouble than ever, according to a United Nations biodiversity report released on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
FILE - In this Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019 file photo, smoke rises from a rainforest in Altamira, Para state, Brazil. A decade-long effort by the world to save the world’s disappearing species and declining ecosystems has mostly failed so far, with fragile ecosystems like coral reefs and tropical forests in even more trouble than ever, according to a United Nations biodiversity report released on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)