Japan celebrates Osaka; Sponsors cautious about activism

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Japan celebrates Osaka; Sponsors cautious about activism

FILE - In this Sept. 8, 2020, file photo, Naomi Osaka, of Japan, wears a protective mask due to the COVID-19 virus outbreak, featuring the name "George Floyd", while arriving on court to face Shelby Rogers, of the United States, during the quarterfinal round of the US Open tennis championships, in New York. Osaka's victory in the U.S. Open helped raised the issue of racial injustice in the United States. Before each of her matches, she wore a mask with the names of seven Black Americans who died as victims of violence.(AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2020, file photo, Naomi Osaka, of Japan, holds up the championship trophy after defeating Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, in the women's singles final of the US Open tennis championships, in New York. Osaka's victory in the U.S. Open helped raised the issue of racial injustice in the United States. Before each of her matches, she wore a mask with the names of seven Black Americans who died as victims of violence. The daughter of a Japanese mother and Haitian father, she has become a leader of the Black Lives Matter movement. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2020, file photo, Naomi Osaka, of Japan, reacts during the women's singles final against Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, during the US Open tennis championships, in New York. Japan is celebrating Naomi Osaka's victory at the U.S. Open, especially her array of corporate sponsors - many of whom represent corporate Japan.But like much of Japan, they are more muted in backing — or understanding — her campaign against racial injustice in the United States. Unlike the United States, Japan has relatively few immigrants and has a generally low level of awareness about racism — even at home. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2020, file photo, Naomi Osaka, of Japan, returns a shot to Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, during the women's singles final of the US Open tennis championships, in New York. Osaka's victory in the U.S. Open helped raised the issue of racial injustice in the United States. Before each of her matches, she wore a mask with the names of seven Black Americans who died as victims of violence. The daughter of a Japanese mother and Haitian father, she has become a leader of the Black Lives Matter movement. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

Japan celebrates Osaka; Sponsors cautious about activism

FILE - In this Sept. 8, 2020, file photo, Naomi Osaka, of Japan, wears a protective mask due to the COVID-19 virus outbreak, featuring the name "George Floyd", while arriving on court to face Shelby Rogers, of the United States, during the quarterfinal round of the US Open tennis championships, in New York. Osaka's victory in the U.S. Open helped raised the issue of racial injustice in the United States. Before each of her matches, she wore a mask with the names of seven Black Americans who died as victims of violence.(AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2020, file photo, Naomi Osaka, of Japan, holds up the championship trophy after defeating Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, in the women's singles final of the US Open tennis championships, in New York. Osaka's victory in the U.S. Open helped raised the issue of racial injustice in the United States. Before each of her matches, she wore a mask with the names of seven Black Americans who died as victims of violence. The daughter of a Japanese mother and Haitian father, she has become a leader of the Black Lives Matter movement. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2020, file photo, Naomi Osaka, of Japan, reacts during the women's singles final against Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, during the US Open tennis championships, in New York. Japan is celebrating Naomi Osaka's victory at the U.S. Open, especially her array of corporate sponsors - many of whom represent corporate Japan.But like much of Japan, they are more muted in backing — or understanding — her campaign against racial injustice in the United States. Unlike the United States, Japan has relatively few immigrants and has a generally low level of awareness about racism — even at home. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2020, file photo, Naomi Osaka, of Japan, returns a shot to Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, during the women's singles final of the US Open tennis championships, in New York. Osaka's victory in the U.S. Open helped raised the issue of racial injustice in the United States. Before each of her matches, she wore a mask with the names of seven Black Americans who died as victims of violence. The daughter of a Japanese mother and Haitian father, she has become a leader of the Black Lives Matter movement. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)