Project finds apple thought to be extinct

Project finds apple thought to be extinct

Cloning may preserve Raspberry apple, two others in area
Jude Schuenemeyer demonstrates grafting apple trees at a seventh-grade science class in the Cortez Middle School.
Jude Schuenemeyer demonstrates grafting a fruit tree.
Spring pruning tips

General pruning guidlines:
A more open tree with fewer small branches allows light and air to flow through the branches and prevents disease.
Start as soon as possible this spring because the weather has been warm and most trees have started to bud.
Think about what the tree should look like three years from now and prune with that in mind.
Take off all dead branches.
Do not leave flat cuts facing the sky because they will fill with moisture that will cause decay.
Try to keep branches pruned high enough so deer can't pull down the branches.
Try not to peel away the bark when making cuts.
Secondary branches should be a third of the diameter of main branches to keep the sap flowing.
Apple and pear trees:
Only Take off 25 percent of the live branches.
Pruning less of the tree prevents it from sending up so many small branches that can't support the weight of the fruit.
A little bit of pruning each year will do more good than trying to get it all done at once.
Pruning some buds now will prevent having to thin fruit later.
Peach trees:
Respond well to heavy pruning as long as the secondary branches are a third the diameter of main branches to keep the sap flowing.
Cherry trees:
Only take off about 20 percent of the live branches
General tree health:
Clearing dead fruit off the ground prevents coddling moths and other pests from finding a home in the fruit. It will help keep next year's crop healthier.
Manure makes the best fertilizer.
Be careful with systemic pesticides because they can kill bees.
Systemics, depending on which ones are used can also render the fruit unsafe to eat.
A healthy tree will fight off disease on its own.
-Tips acquired at a free pruning workshop held by the Montezuma Orchard Restoration Project.

Project finds apple thought to be extinct

Jude Schuenemeyer demonstrates grafting apple trees at a seventh-grade science class in the Cortez Middle School.
Jude Schuenemeyer demonstrates grafting a fruit tree.
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