KSJD could feel federal cuts

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KSJD could feel federal cuts

Congressional effort to defund public broadcasting could affect local Dryland Community Radio
Journal/Sam Green
Jeff Pope, executive director at KSJD, stands in front of an image for the local Dryland Community Radio station. Congressional efforts to cut federal funding for public broadcasting could impact KSJD.
KSJD maintains NPR support

The recent release of a hidden-camera video of National Public Radio executive Ron Schiller calling the tea party racist and saying the network would be better off without federal money anyway spurred Republicans to further their case against taxpayers’ money going toward public broadcasting.
Vivian Schiller, no relation, was forced out as NPR’s chief executive officer last week because of the recent turmoil.
“We’ve just exposed the true hearts and minds of NPR and their executives,” activist John O’Keefe posted on his website, Project Veritas.
“This disturbing video makes it clear that taxpayer dollars should no longer be appropriated to NPR,” House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., said.
Jeff Pope, executive director of local KSJD Dryland Community Radio, wants community members to see the bigger picture.
“NPR does not mean public broadcasting,” Pope said. “NPR is on the air (at KSJD) 20 hours a week. As a recipient station of CPB (Corporation for Public Broadcasting), we can choose to buy NPR or not.”
Many public radio stations choose NPR because it’s “excellent programming,” Pope said.
“We also carry other syndicated programs like American Public Media and Native Voice One,” he said.
KSJD won’t distance itself from NPR, Pope said. He said he believes it’s the best radio news in America.
“In this rural conservative community, NPR is an excellent fit,” he said.
Pope also questions if the funding cut is being used as a political vendetta.
He said he believes NPR coverage of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq was better than coverage from any other media outlet. He also added that NPR’s investigative unit uncovered and changed Pentagon policy on treating post-traumatic stress disorder for servicemen and women.
“We have a lot of veterans around here,” Pope said. “We have a lot of people that want to know what’s happening.”
KSJD feels NPR news is valuable, Pope said.
“They have good reporting, and our community deserves that,” he said.

The Associated Press contributed to this article.

Reach Paula Bostrom at paulab@cortezjournal.com.

KSJD could feel federal cuts

Journal/Sam Green
Jeff Pope, executive director at KSJD, stands in front of an image for the local Dryland Community Radio station. Congressional efforts to cut federal funding for public broadcasting could impact KSJD.
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