Who’s next?

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Who’s next?

Few Colorado women in top spots in politics, but that could change
U.S. Rep. Patricia Schroeder was elected into office in 1972 – the first female to represent Colorado.
New Senate President Morgan Carroll, left, talks with her Chief of Staff Kjersten Forseth during the opening session of the 2014 Colorado Legislature, at the Capitol in Denver, in January. Fellow Democratic Senator Lucia Guzman is pictured at the podium in the background.
Coffman
Fields
Kennedy
Roberts
Stephens
Carroll
A man’s world

Elected officials from Colorado since 1972
U.S. House
26 men
4 women
U.S. Senate
11 men
0 women
Governor
6 men
0 women

IF YOU GO

As part of Women’s History Month, the International Studies Program at Fort Lewis College is presenting a screening of the film “Miss Representation” at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 4, in Room 120 at the Center of Southwest Studies. Admission is free, but donations will be accepted.
“Miss Representation” explores women’s underrepresentation in positions of power and influence in America.

Women to watch in Colorado

Amy Stephens
Party: Republican
Position: State representative, former House majority leader
Stephens is the lone woman from either party running for U.S. Senate. She will have to get past fellow Republican Ken Buck, who beat out another woman, Jane Norton, for the GOP nomination four years ago in a campaign that was heavily tinged with gender politics.
Ellen Roberts
Party: Republican
Position: State senator from Southwest Colorado
Roberts is well liked in both parties and has soundly won elections in her independent-minded district. She is running for re-election to the Senate but has not made public moves for higher office.
Cary Kennedy
Party: Democrat
Position: Chief financial officer for the city of Denver
Kennedy had a high profile as state treasurer for one term, creating the program that has allowed dozens of schools to be built in rural Colorado. Her loss in 2010 hit Democrats harder than just about any race in that GOP wave year.
Rhonda Fields
Party: Democrat
Position: State representative, Aurora
Fields gained unusually high visibility for a state representative in 2013, becoming the public face of both gun control and the pro-death penalty movements. She ran for office after her son and his fiancee were gunned down to prevent his testimony against gang members.
Cynthia Coffman
Party: Republican
Position: Chief deputy attorney general
Coffman is running against state Rep. Mark Waller to be the Republican candidate for attorney general. She would be the state’s second-ever female attorney general. Her husband, Mike, is the congressman from Aurora and is locked in one of the country’s tightest U.S. House races.
Morgan Carroll
Party: Democrat
Position: Senate president
Carroll is the second woman in Colorado to hold the top post in the Senate. Her name has come up frequently as a potential attorney general candidate, but she is not running this year.
Joe Hanel

Who’s next?

U.S. Rep. Patricia Schroeder was elected into office in 1972 – the first female to represent Colorado.
New Senate President Morgan Carroll, left, talks with her Chief of Staff Kjersten Forseth during the opening session of the 2014 Colorado Legislature, at the Capitol in Denver, in January. Fellow Democratic Senator Lucia Guzman is pictured at the podium in the background.
Coffman
Fields
Kennedy
Roberts
Stephens
Carroll
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