Black Lives Matter spurs scrutiny of Dutch colonial past

News

Black Lives Matter spurs scrutiny of Dutch colonial past

In this Thursday, June 11, 2020, file image, A statue of the Dutch Golden Age trader and brutal colonialist Jan Pieterszoon Coen stands tall above a square in his hometown of Hoorn, north of Amsterdam, Netherlands. Coen was a leading figure in 17th-century trading powerhouse the Dutch East India Company, but has gone down in history as the "butcher of Banda," the man who ordered a bloody massacre on the Banda Islands, Indonesia. Activists spurred by the Black Lives Matter protests in the United States are seeking to shed more light on the Dutch colonial past and tackle what they call ingrained racism and discrimination in this nation that was once known as a beacon of tolerance. (AP Photo/Michael Corder, File)
In this Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013, file image, Netherlands' King Willem-Alexander and his wife Queen Maxima arrive in the Golden Carriage at Noordeinde Palace, after the King officially opened the new parliamentary year in The Hague, Netherlands. Even the horse-drawn Golden Carriage, currently undergoing a lengthy restoration but traditionally used to carry the Dutch monarch to the state opening of Parliament each year, has drawn criticism because one of its panels, center, is decorated with a painting depicting Africans and Asians carrying goods to present to their colonial masters. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, file)
In this Sunday Nov. 17, 2013, file image, a man holds a sign reading "Black Pete is Racism" during the parade of Black Pete, the blackface sidekick of Sinterklaas, the Dutch version of Santa Claus, in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers has sparked a reexamination of many countries' colonial histories, actions and traditions, that often were exalted in the form of statues and other memorials. The Netherlands has been wrestling for years with issues of racism, with much of the debate revolving around the divisive children's character Black Pete, who is usually portrayed by white people wearing blackface makeup at celebrations each December marking Sinterklaas, a Dutch celebration of St. Nicholas. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)
In this Friday June 12, 2020, file image, A municipal worker uses a high pressure water cleaner to remove the paint from the statue of Piet Hein in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Friday, June 12, 2020. Dutch activists have spray painted the words "killer" and "thief" and daubed red paint on a statue of a man regarded by many as a naval hero from the 17th-century Golden Era of Dutch trade and colonial expansion. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)
In this Saturday Nov. 16, 2013, file image, people react to the arrival of Black Petes, the blackface sidekicks of Sinterklaas, the Dutch version of Santa Claus, in the harbor of Hoorn, Netherlands. The death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers has sparked a reexamination of many countries' colonial histories, actions and traditions, that often were exalted in the form of statues and other memorials. The Netherlands has been wrestling for years with issues of racism, with much of the debate revolving around the divisive children's character Black Pete, who is usually portrayed by white people wearing blackface makeup at celebrations each December marking Sinterklaas, a Dutch celebration of St. Nicholas. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)
In this Friday June 12, 2020, file image, A municipal worker uses a high pressure water cleaner to remove the paint from the statue of Piet Hein in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Friday, June 12, 2020. Dutch activists have spray painted the words "killer" and "thief" and daubed red paint on a statue of a man regarded by many as a naval hero from the 17th-century Golden Era of Dutch trade and colonial expansion. Activists spurred by the Black Lives Matter protests in the United States are seeking to shed more light on the Dutch colonial past and tackle what they call ingrained racism and discrimination in this nation that was once known as a beacon of tolerance. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)
In this Saturday Nov. 16, 2019, file image, Zwarte Piet, or Black Pete, right, the controversial blackfaced sidekick of Saint Nicholas, rear left, walks in a parade in Scheveningen harbor, near The Hague, Netherlands. Activists spurred by the Black Lives Matter protests in the United States are seeking to shed more light on the Dutch colonial past and tackle what they call ingrained racism and discrimination in this nation that was once known as a beacon of tolerance. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)
In this Sunday Nov. 17, 2013, file image, A demonstrator with a cross taped over his mouth, foreground, turns his back to the parade Black Petes, the blackface sidekicks of Sinterklaas, the Dutch version of Santa Claus, in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers has sparked a reexamination of many countries' colonial histories, actions and traditions, that often were exalted in the form of statues and other memorials. The Netherlands has been wrestling for years with issues of racism, with much of the debate revolving around the divisive children's character Black Pete, who is usually portrayed by white people wearing blackface makeup at celebrations each December marking Sinterklaas, a Dutch celebration of St. Nicholas. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)

Black Lives Matter spurs scrutiny of Dutch colonial past

In this Thursday, June 11, 2020, file image, A statue of the Dutch Golden Age trader and brutal colonialist Jan Pieterszoon Coen stands tall above a square in his hometown of Hoorn, north of Amsterdam, Netherlands. Coen was a leading figure in 17th-century trading powerhouse the Dutch East India Company, but has gone down in history as the "butcher of Banda," the man who ordered a bloody massacre on the Banda Islands, Indonesia. Activists spurred by the Black Lives Matter protests in the United States are seeking to shed more light on the Dutch colonial past and tackle what they call ingrained racism and discrimination in this nation that was once known as a beacon of tolerance. (AP Photo/Michael Corder, File)
In this Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013, file image, Netherlands' King Willem-Alexander and his wife Queen Maxima arrive in the Golden Carriage at Noordeinde Palace, after the King officially opened the new parliamentary year in The Hague, Netherlands. Even the horse-drawn Golden Carriage, currently undergoing a lengthy restoration but traditionally used to carry the Dutch monarch to the state opening of Parliament each year, has drawn criticism because one of its panels, center, is decorated with a painting depicting Africans and Asians carrying goods to present to their colonial masters. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, file)
In this Sunday Nov. 17, 2013, file image, a man holds a sign reading "Black Pete is Racism" during the parade of Black Pete, the blackface sidekick of Sinterklaas, the Dutch version of Santa Claus, in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers has sparked a reexamination of many countries' colonial histories, actions and traditions, that often were exalted in the form of statues and other memorials. The Netherlands has been wrestling for years with issues of racism, with much of the debate revolving around the divisive children's character Black Pete, who is usually portrayed by white people wearing blackface makeup at celebrations each December marking Sinterklaas, a Dutch celebration of St. Nicholas. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)
In this Friday June 12, 2020, file image, A municipal worker uses a high pressure water cleaner to remove the paint from the statue of Piet Hein in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Friday, June 12, 2020. Dutch activists have spray painted the words "killer" and "thief" and daubed red paint on a statue of a man regarded by many as a naval hero from the 17th-century Golden Era of Dutch trade and colonial expansion. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)
In this Saturday Nov. 16, 2013, file image, people react to the arrival of Black Petes, the blackface sidekicks of Sinterklaas, the Dutch version of Santa Claus, in the harbor of Hoorn, Netherlands. The death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers has sparked a reexamination of many countries' colonial histories, actions and traditions, that often were exalted in the form of statues and other memorials. The Netherlands has been wrestling for years with issues of racism, with much of the debate revolving around the divisive children's character Black Pete, who is usually portrayed by white people wearing blackface makeup at celebrations each December marking Sinterklaas, a Dutch celebration of St. Nicholas. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)
In this Friday June 12, 2020, file image, A municipal worker uses a high pressure water cleaner to remove the paint from the statue of Piet Hein in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Friday, June 12, 2020. Dutch activists have spray painted the words "killer" and "thief" and daubed red paint on a statue of a man regarded by many as a naval hero from the 17th-century Golden Era of Dutch trade and colonial expansion. Activists spurred by the Black Lives Matter protests in the United States are seeking to shed more light on the Dutch colonial past and tackle what they call ingrained racism and discrimination in this nation that was once known as a beacon of tolerance. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)
In this Saturday Nov. 16, 2019, file image, Zwarte Piet, or Black Pete, right, the controversial blackfaced sidekick of Saint Nicholas, rear left, walks in a parade in Scheveningen harbor, near The Hague, Netherlands. Activists spurred by the Black Lives Matter protests in the United States are seeking to shed more light on the Dutch colonial past and tackle what they call ingrained racism and discrimination in this nation that was once known as a beacon of tolerance. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)
In this Sunday Nov. 17, 2013, file image, A demonstrator with a cross taped over his mouth, foreground, turns his back to the parade Black Petes, the blackface sidekicks of Sinterklaas, the Dutch version of Santa Claus, in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers has sparked a reexamination of many countries' colonial histories, actions and traditions, that often were exalted in the form of statues and other memorials. The Netherlands has been wrestling for years with issues of racism, with much of the debate revolving around the divisive children's character Black Pete, who is usually portrayed by white people wearing blackface makeup at celebrations each December marking Sinterklaas, a Dutch celebration of St. Nicholas. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)
click here to add your event
Area Events