Cities find green ways to reduce storm floods

Journal tiny

Local coronavirus coverage

News

Cities find green ways to reduce storm floods

In this Friday, May 15, 2020 photo, houses are seen near a recently completed "bioswale" at Prentiss Ave. and Press Drive in New Orleans. For more than a century, New Orleans has depended on canals and pumps to get rid of stormwater in a city that is largely below sea level. Now a city that expanded by filling in wetlands is spending $270 million to create spaces for stormwater, like the water garden on a 25-acre site provided by nuns who lived there before Hurricane Katrina. It's also installing underground holding tanks, porous pavement and other measures to reduce storm flooding and the stress on huge pumps built in the 1910s. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
In this photo from 1950 provided by the Congregation of St. Joseph, priests and nuns participate in a groundbreaking ceremony for the Mirabeau Provincial House in New Orleans. For more than a century, New Orleans has depended on canals and pumps to get rid of stormwater in a city that is largely below sea level. Now a city that expanded by filling in wetlands is spending $270 million to create spaces for stormwater, like the water garden on a 25-acre site provided by nuns who lived there before Hurricane Katrina. It's also installing underground holding tanks, porous pavement and other measures to reduce storm flooding and the stress on huge pumps built in the 1910s.(Congregation of St. Joseph via AP)
In this Friday, May 15, 2020 photo photo, clouds form over vegetation planted in a recently completed "bioswale" at Prentiss Ave. and Press Drive in New Orleans. For more than a century, New Orleans has depended on canals and pumps to get rid of stormwater in a city that is largely below sea level. Now a city that expanded by filling in wetlands is spending $270 million to create spaces for stormwater, like the water garden on a 25-acre site provided by nuns who lived there before Hurricane Katrina. It's also installing underground holding tanks, porous pavement and other measures to reduce storm flooding and the stress on huge pumps built in the 1910s. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
This 2016 photo provided by the City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services shows the Foster Floodplain Natural Area in Portland, Ore. Portland bought 60 houses over 15 years, then turned a regularly flooded neighborhood into Foster Floodplain Natural Area. The work, which included creek restoration for migrating salmon and steelhead trout, increased the flood storage capacity six-fold — enough to fill nearly 70 Olympic-sized swimming pools. (City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services via AP)
This 2016 photo provided by the City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services shows the Foster Floodplain Natural Area in Portland, Ore, Portland bought 60 houses over 15 years, then turned a regularly flooded neighborhood into Foster Floodplain Natural Area. The work, which included creek restoration for migrating salmon and steelhead trout, increased the flood storage capacity six-fold — enough to fill nearly 70 Olympic-sized swimming pools. (Naim Hasan Photography/City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services via AP)
This Aug. 12, 2013 photo provided by the City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services the ecoroofs in South Waterfront and Elizabeth Caruthers Park in Portland, Ore. Cities around the country are taking creative steps to tame stormwater as climate change increases the number and intensity of hurricanes and other storms. One technique includes planting trees and digging lagoons in wide roadway medians. Jurisdictions such as Portland, require greenery-covered “ecoroofs” on some buildings.(City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services via AP)
This Aug. 12, 2013 photo provided by the City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services the ecoroofs in South Waterfront and Elizabeth Caruthers Park in Portland, Ore. Cities around the country are taking creative steps to tame stormwater as climate change increases the number and intensity of hurricanes and other storms. One technique includes planting trees and digging lagoons in wide roadway medians. Jurisdictions such as Portland, require greenery-covered “ecoroofs” on some buildings.(City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services via AP)
In this Friday, May 15, 2020 photo, a pipe is seen running through a recently completed "bioswale" at Prentiss Ave. and Press Drive in New Orleans. For more than a century, New Orleans has depended on canals and pumps to get rid of stormwater in a city that is largely below sea level. Now a city that expanded by filling in wetlands is spending $270 million to create spaces for stormwater, like the water garden on a 25-acre site provided by nuns who lived there before Hurricane Katrina. It's also installing underground holding tanks, porous pavement and other measures to reduce storm flooding and the stress on huge pumps built in the 1910s. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
In this Friday, May 15, 2020 photo, a recently completed "bioswale" is seen at Prentiss Ave. and Press Drive in New Orleans. For more than a century, New Orleans has depended on canals and pumps to get rid of stormwater in a city that is largely below sea level. Now a city that expanded by filling in wetlands is spending $270 million to create spaces for stormwater, like the water garden on a 25-acre site provided by nuns who lived there before Hurricane Katrina. It's also installing underground holding tanks, porous pavement and other measures to reduce storm flooding and the stress on huge pumps built in the 1910s. AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
This image provided by the City of Atlanta, Department of Watershed Management, shows a section some of more than 4 and a half miles of residential streets in Atlanta, where the city has installed pavers that let stormwater seep into the ground below rather than running off into storm drains. As climate change makes storms more frequent and more intense, cities and counties nationwide are turning to water gardens, planted roofs, porous pavement and other “green infrastructure” to tame stormwater. (City of Atlanta, Department of Watershed Management via AP)
This image provided by the City of Atlanta, Department of Watershed Management, shows a section some of more than 4 and a half miles of residential streets in Atlanta, where the city has installed pavers that let stormwater seep into the ground below rather than running off into storm drains. As climate change makes storms more frequent and more intense, cities and counties nationwide are turning to water gardens, planted roofs, porous pavement and other “green infrastructure” to tame stormwater. (City of Atlanta, Department of Watershed Management via AP)

Cities find green ways to reduce storm floods

In this Friday, May 15, 2020 photo, houses are seen near a recently completed "bioswale" at Prentiss Ave. and Press Drive in New Orleans. For more than a century, New Orleans has depended on canals and pumps to get rid of stormwater in a city that is largely below sea level. Now a city that expanded by filling in wetlands is spending $270 million to create spaces for stormwater, like the water garden on a 25-acre site provided by nuns who lived there before Hurricane Katrina. It's also installing underground holding tanks, porous pavement and other measures to reduce storm flooding and the stress on huge pumps built in the 1910s. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
In this photo from 1950 provided by the Congregation of St. Joseph, priests and nuns participate in a groundbreaking ceremony for the Mirabeau Provincial House in New Orleans. For more than a century, New Orleans has depended on canals and pumps to get rid of stormwater in a city that is largely below sea level. Now a city that expanded by filling in wetlands is spending $270 million to create spaces for stormwater, like the water garden on a 25-acre site provided by nuns who lived there before Hurricane Katrina. It's also installing underground holding tanks, porous pavement and other measures to reduce storm flooding and the stress on huge pumps built in the 1910s.(Congregation of St. Joseph via AP)
In this Friday, May 15, 2020 photo photo, clouds form over vegetation planted in a recently completed "bioswale" at Prentiss Ave. and Press Drive in New Orleans. For more than a century, New Orleans has depended on canals and pumps to get rid of stormwater in a city that is largely below sea level. Now a city that expanded by filling in wetlands is spending $270 million to create spaces for stormwater, like the water garden on a 25-acre site provided by nuns who lived there before Hurricane Katrina. It's also installing underground holding tanks, porous pavement and other measures to reduce storm flooding and the stress on huge pumps built in the 1910s. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
This 2016 photo provided by the City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services shows the Foster Floodplain Natural Area in Portland, Ore. Portland bought 60 houses over 15 years, then turned a regularly flooded neighborhood into Foster Floodplain Natural Area. The work, which included creek restoration for migrating salmon and steelhead trout, increased the flood storage capacity six-fold — enough to fill nearly 70 Olympic-sized swimming pools. (City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services via AP)
This 2016 photo provided by the City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services shows the Foster Floodplain Natural Area in Portland, Ore, Portland bought 60 houses over 15 years, then turned a regularly flooded neighborhood into Foster Floodplain Natural Area. The work, which included creek restoration for migrating salmon and steelhead trout, increased the flood storage capacity six-fold — enough to fill nearly 70 Olympic-sized swimming pools. (Naim Hasan Photography/City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services via AP)
This Aug. 12, 2013 photo provided by the City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services the ecoroofs in South Waterfront and Elizabeth Caruthers Park in Portland, Ore. Cities around the country are taking creative steps to tame stormwater as climate change increases the number and intensity of hurricanes and other storms. One technique includes planting trees and digging lagoons in wide roadway medians. Jurisdictions such as Portland, require greenery-covered “ecoroofs” on some buildings.(City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services via AP)
This Aug. 12, 2013 photo provided by the City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services the ecoroofs in South Waterfront and Elizabeth Caruthers Park in Portland, Ore. Cities around the country are taking creative steps to tame stormwater as climate change increases the number and intensity of hurricanes and other storms. One technique includes planting trees and digging lagoons in wide roadway medians. Jurisdictions such as Portland, require greenery-covered “ecoroofs” on some buildings.(City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services via AP)
In this Friday, May 15, 2020 photo, a pipe is seen running through a recently completed "bioswale" at Prentiss Ave. and Press Drive in New Orleans. For more than a century, New Orleans has depended on canals and pumps to get rid of stormwater in a city that is largely below sea level. Now a city that expanded by filling in wetlands is spending $270 million to create spaces for stormwater, like the water garden on a 25-acre site provided by nuns who lived there before Hurricane Katrina. It's also installing underground holding tanks, porous pavement and other measures to reduce storm flooding and the stress on huge pumps built in the 1910s. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
In this Friday, May 15, 2020 photo, a recently completed "bioswale" is seen at Prentiss Ave. and Press Drive in New Orleans. For more than a century, New Orleans has depended on canals and pumps to get rid of stormwater in a city that is largely below sea level. Now a city that expanded by filling in wetlands is spending $270 million to create spaces for stormwater, like the water garden on a 25-acre site provided by nuns who lived there before Hurricane Katrina. It's also installing underground holding tanks, porous pavement and other measures to reduce storm flooding and the stress on huge pumps built in the 1910s. AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
This image provided by the City of Atlanta, Department of Watershed Management, shows a section some of more than 4 and a half miles of residential streets in Atlanta, where the city has installed pavers that let stormwater seep into the ground below rather than running off into storm drains. As climate change makes storms more frequent and more intense, cities and counties nationwide are turning to water gardens, planted roofs, porous pavement and other “green infrastructure” to tame stormwater. (City of Atlanta, Department of Watershed Management via AP)
This image provided by the City of Atlanta, Department of Watershed Management, shows a section some of more than 4 and a half miles of residential streets in Atlanta, where the city has installed pavers that let stormwater seep into the ground below rather than running off into storm drains. As climate change makes storms more frequent and more intense, cities and counties nationwide are turning to water gardens, planted roofs, porous pavement and other “green infrastructure” to tame stormwater. (City of Atlanta, Department of Watershed Management via AP)
click here to add your event
Area Events