Lawyers, judges push to close immigration courts amid virus

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Lawyers, judges push to close immigration courts amid virus

This March 23, 2020 photo provided by Margarita Silva shows her wearing her husband’s land surveyor goggles, a mask she borrowed from a friend and medical gloves she got from a hardware store outside the La Palma Detention Center in Eloy, Ariz. Attorneys and judges in U.S. immigration courts are trying to protect themselves from the coronavirus with borrowed masks and hand sanitizer. The Trump administration has delayed hearings for immigrants who aren't in detention but is moving forward for those who are. (Margarita Silva via AP)
FILE - In this Nov. 15, 2019, file photo, a detainee talks on the phone in his pod at the Stewart Detention Center in Lumpkin, Ga. While much of daily life has ground to a halt to reduce the spread of the coronavirus, the Trump administration is resisting calls from immigration judges and attorneys to stop in-person hearings and shutter all immigration courts. They say the most pressing hearings can still be done by phone so immigrants aren't stuck in detention indefinitely. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
In this March 25, 2020, photo, Attorney Margarita Silva sits in her office in Phoenix. Silva was recently denied entry to a hearing inside an immigration detention center under a new requirement for lawyers to bring their own masks, protective eye gear and gloves to protect against coronavirus. While some immigration courts have closed, the Trump administration has insisted on keeping many open amid fierce resistance from judges and even Homeland Security Department attorneys. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Lawyers, judges push to close immigration courts amid virus

This March 23, 2020 photo provided by Margarita Silva shows her wearing her husband’s land surveyor goggles, a mask she borrowed from a friend and medical gloves she got from a hardware store outside the La Palma Detention Center in Eloy, Ariz. Attorneys and judges in U.S. immigration courts are trying to protect themselves from the coronavirus with borrowed masks and hand sanitizer. The Trump administration has delayed hearings for immigrants who aren't in detention but is moving forward for those who are. (Margarita Silva via AP)
FILE - In this Nov. 15, 2019, file photo, a detainee talks on the phone in his pod at the Stewart Detention Center in Lumpkin, Ga. While much of daily life has ground to a halt to reduce the spread of the coronavirus, the Trump administration is resisting calls from immigration judges and attorneys to stop in-person hearings and shutter all immigration courts. They say the most pressing hearings can still be done by phone so immigrants aren't stuck in detention indefinitely. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
In this March 25, 2020, photo, Attorney Margarita Silva sits in her office in Phoenix. Silva was recently denied entry to a hearing inside an immigration detention center under a new requirement for lawyers to bring their own masks, protective eye gear and gloves to protect against coronavirus. While some immigration courts have closed, the Trump administration has insisted on keeping many open amid fierce resistance from judges and even Homeland Security Department attorneys. (AP Photo/Matt York)
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