Pioneer Josie Bassett earns a spot in history

Pioneer Josie Bassett earns a spot in history

Josie Bassett left a legacy that earns a spot in women’s history
Josie sits astride a favorite mount as she watches her small cattle herd near her Cub Creek cabin.
Josie Bassett grew up on one of the last frontiers of the American West near the Three Corners where Colorado, Wyoming and Utah meet. Born in the 1870s, she had an iron will and fierce streak of independence. She dated Butch Cassidy, rustled cattle and sold liquor during Prohibition. Here, she listens to the radio in the cabin she built in Dinosaur National Monument.
Wearing coveralls, her standard attire for her rugged outdoor life, Josie Bassett poses near an Indian basket.
Seated in her cabin kitchen, Josie Bassett prepares a meal. Her fame included an article about her in Life magazine in 1948.
As a young woman in Craig in the 19th century, Josie Bassett wore a fashionable dress and her hands in a muff as she stands second from right.
The last cabin Josie Bassett built on her Cub Creek property in Dinosaur National Monument has been stabilized and restored with $84,000 in support from the Intermountain Natural History Association, including donations from 14 separate families, businesses and foundations. Around the cabin she planted trees of silver birch, willow, poplar, cottonwood and elm along with flower beds of cosmos, marigolds and poppies.
Josie kept stolen livestock penned in Hog Canyon where, in 1989, a rare orchid was discovered. Spiranthes diluvialis is a threatened species and part of the biodiversity at Dinosaur National Monument.
Adjacent to Josie’s small cabin is Box Canyon, which rises up toward the Green River. Josie made moonshine and sold it along the river where Moonshine Rapids now thrills modern river runners.

Pioneer Josie Bassett earns a spot in history

Josie sits astride a favorite mount as she watches her small cattle herd near her Cub Creek cabin.
Josie Bassett grew up on one of the last frontiers of the American West near the Three Corners where Colorado, Wyoming and Utah meet. Born in the 1870s, she had an iron will and fierce streak of independence. She dated Butch Cassidy, rustled cattle and sold liquor during Prohibition. Here, she listens to the radio in the cabin she built in Dinosaur National Monument.
Wearing coveralls, her standard attire for her rugged outdoor life, Josie Bassett poses near an Indian basket.
Seated in her cabin kitchen, Josie Bassett prepares a meal. Her fame included an article about her in Life magazine in 1948.
As a young woman in Craig in the 19th century, Josie Bassett wore a fashionable dress and her hands in a muff as she stands second from right.
The last cabin Josie Bassett built on her Cub Creek property in Dinosaur National Monument has been stabilized and restored with $84,000 in support from the Intermountain Natural History Association, including donations from 14 separate families, businesses and foundations. Around the cabin she planted trees of silver birch, willow, poplar, cottonwood and elm along with flower beds of cosmos, marigolds and poppies.
Josie kept stolen livestock penned in Hog Canyon where, in 1989, a rare orchid was discovered. Spiranthes diluvialis is a threatened species and part of the biodiversity at Dinosaur National Monument.
Adjacent to Josie’s small cabin is Box Canyon, which rises up toward the Green River. Josie made moonshine and sold it along the river where Moonshine Rapids now thrills modern river runners.
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