New device in New Mexico turns back clock on astronomy

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New device in New Mexico turns back clock on astronomy

Bill Donahue, a retired teacher and director of laboratories at St. John’s College, uses an armillary sphere to track planetary rotations and explore the history of astronomy in Santa Fe. The unique precision-steel replica of an instrument created by Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe was commissioned by graduates of the college where students trace the evolution of math and science from early civilizations.
Bill Donahue, a retired teacher and director of laboratories at St. John’s College, adjusts the site on an armillary sphere to track planetary rotations and explore the history of astronomy in Santa Fe. The unique precision-steel replica of an instrument created by Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe was commissioned by graduates of the college where students trace the evolution of math and science from early civilizations.
Bill Donahue, center, a retired teacher and director of laboratories at St. John’s College, uses an armillary sphere to track planetary rotations and explore the history of astronomy in Santa Fe. The unique precision-steel replica of an instrument created by Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe was commissioned by graduates of the college where students trace the evolution of math and science from early civilizations.
Bill Donahue, right, a retired teacher and director of laboratories at St. John’s College, and student Devin Ketch use an armillary sphere to track planetary rotations and explore the history of astronomy in Santa Fe.

New device in New Mexico turns back clock on astronomy

Bill Donahue, a retired teacher and director of laboratories at St. John’s College, uses an armillary sphere to track planetary rotations and explore the history of astronomy in Santa Fe. The unique precision-steel replica of an instrument created by Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe was commissioned by graduates of the college where students trace the evolution of math and science from early civilizations.
Bill Donahue, a retired teacher and director of laboratories at St. John’s College, adjusts the site on an armillary sphere to track planetary rotations and explore the history of astronomy in Santa Fe. The unique precision-steel replica of an instrument created by Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe was commissioned by graduates of the college where students trace the evolution of math and science from early civilizations.
Bill Donahue, center, a retired teacher and director of laboratories at St. John’s College, uses an armillary sphere to track planetary rotations and explore the history of astronomy in Santa Fe. The unique precision-steel replica of an instrument created by Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe was commissioned by graduates of the college where students trace the evolution of math and science from early civilizations.
Bill Donahue, right, a retired teacher and director of laboratories at St. John’s College, and student Devin Ketch use an armillary sphere to track planetary rotations and explore the history of astronomy in Santa Fe.
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