Church’s Native Hope Solar brings light and heat to Navajo families

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Church’s Native Hope Solar brings light and heat to Navajo families

First United Methodist group’s efforts grow among isolated residents
Wiring is finished for a solar lighting system in a home in the Chinle Chapter of the Navajo Nation.
Tré Price wires a lighting unit that Native Hope Solar uses in its solar installations to bring electricity to remote homes in the Chinle Chapter of the Navajo Nation. Looking on are Ruben Neubauer, Skip Warner and Brody Guion.
A solar lighting unit is installed on a hogan in Lukachukai, Ariz.
Last winter, Native Hope Solar installed about 100 solar lighting systems in remote homes in the Chinle Chapter of the Navajo Nation. The nonprofit group that operates under the auspices of the First United Methodist Church in Durango is also looking to install 100 solar lighting systems this winter in the Chinle Chapter.
Skip Warner, left, Melton Tom, center, and Brody Guion installed about 100 solar units in homes in remote parts of the Chinle Chapter of the Navajo Nation last year. The main goal was to provide lighting in the homes, where children often relied on lanterns or candles to work on homework or to study after dark.
A Native Hope Solar solar panel powers lights in a home in the Chinle Chapter of the Navajo Nation.

Church’s Native Hope Solar brings light and heat to Navajo families

Wiring is finished for a solar lighting system in a home in the Chinle Chapter of the Navajo Nation.
Tré Price wires a lighting unit that Native Hope Solar uses in its solar installations to bring electricity to remote homes in the Chinle Chapter of the Navajo Nation. Looking on are Ruben Neubauer, Skip Warner and Brody Guion.
A solar lighting unit is installed on a hogan in Lukachukai, Ariz.
Last winter, Native Hope Solar installed about 100 solar lighting systems in remote homes in the Chinle Chapter of the Navajo Nation. The nonprofit group that operates under the auspices of the First United Methodist Church in Durango is also looking to install 100 solar lighting systems this winter in the Chinle Chapter.
Skip Warner, left, Melton Tom, center, and Brody Guion installed about 100 solar units in homes in remote parts of the Chinle Chapter of the Navajo Nation last year. The main goal was to provide lighting in the homes, where children often relied on lanterns or candles to work on homework or to study after dark.
A Native Hope Solar solar panel powers lights in a home in the Chinle Chapter of the Navajo Nation.
To donate

Native Hope Solar has funding to provide solar lighting to 100 families without electricity in the Chinle Chapter of the Navajo Nation and is looking for funds to provide lighting systems and other assistance such as winter clothing and firewood.
To make a tax-deductible donation to Native Hope Solar, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, make checks out to First United Methodist Church of Durango and specify “for Native Hope Solar” in the memo line.
Checks can be mailed to First United Methodist Church of Durango, 2917 Aspen Drive, Durango, CO, 81301.

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