For trans activists, recent setbacks temper long-term hopes

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For trans activists, recent setbacks temper long-term hopes

Transgender woman Alison Gill from Maryland, joins LGBT supporters in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, in Washington. The Supreme Court is set to hear arguments in its first cases on LGBT rights since the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy. Kennedy was a voice for gay rights while his successor, Brett Kavanaugh, is regarded as more conservative. Amid their annual vigils for transgender homicide victims, trans-rights activists in the U.S. are trying to maintain long-term optimism even as many hard-won protections are under threat. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Army Capt. Alivia Stehlik, second from left, together with other transgender military members, from left, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Blake Dremann, Army Capt. Jennifer Peace, Army SSgt. Patricia King, and Navy Petty Officer Third Class Akira Wyatt, testify about their service before a House Armed Services Subcommittee on Military Personnel hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2019, as the Trump administration pushes to ban their service. Stehlik is a graduate of West Point and served in Iraq. Amid their annual vigils for transgender homicide victims, trans-rights activists in the U.S. are trying to maintain long-term optimism even as many hard-won protections are under threat. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
In this photo taken Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019, a framed copy of Avery Scurlock's memorial is shown in Avery's mother Brenda Scurlock's home in Lumber Bridge, N.C. Avery, who used the name Chanel when dressing as a woman in social settings and hoped to have sex reassignment surgery, was found shot to death in June. This death of a transgender person in North Carolina is one of 18 so far this year, and 17 of the victims have been black women. Amid their annual vigils for transgender homicide victims, trans-rights activists in the U.S. are trying to maintain long-term optimism even as many hard-won protections are under threat. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
Aimee Stephens talks during in an interview in Ferndale, Mich., Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019. The Supreme Court will hear Stephens' case Oct. 8 over whether federal civil rights law that bars job discrimination on the basis of sex protects transgender people. Other arguments that day deal with whether the same law covers sexual orientation. Amid their annual vigils for transgender homicide victims, trans-rights activists in the U.S. are trying to maintain long-term optimism even as many hard-won protections are under threat. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

For trans activists, recent setbacks temper long-term hopes

Transgender woman Alison Gill from Maryland, joins LGBT supporters in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, in Washington. The Supreme Court is set to hear arguments in its first cases on LGBT rights since the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy. Kennedy was a voice for gay rights while his successor, Brett Kavanaugh, is regarded as more conservative. Amid their annual vigils for transgender homicide victims, trans-rights activists in the U.S. are trying to maintain long-term optimism even as many hard-won protections are under threat. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Army Capt. Alivia Stehlik, second from left, together with other transgender military members, from left, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Blake Dremann, Army Capt. Jennifer Peace, Army SSgt. Patricia King, and Navy Petty Officer Third Class Akira Wyatt, testify about their service before a House Armed Services Subcommittee on Military Personnel hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2019, as the Trump administration pushes to ban their service. Stehlik is a graduate of West Point and served in Iraq. Amid their annual vigils for transgender homicide victims, trans-rights activists in the U.S. are trying to maintain long-term optimism even as many hard-won protections are under threat. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
In this photo taken Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019, a framed copy of Avery Scurlock's memorial is shown in Avery's mother Brenda Scurlock's home in Lumber Bridge, N.C. Avery, who used the name Chanel when dressing as a woman in social settings and hoped to have sex reassignment surgery, was found shot to death in June. This death of a transgender person in North Carolina is one of 18 so far this year, and 17 of the victims have been black women. Amid their annual vigils for transgender homicide victims, trans-rights activists in the U.S. are trying to maintain long-term optimism even as many hard-won protections are under threat. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
Aimee Stephens talks during in an interview in Ferndale, Mich., Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019. The Supreme Court will hear Stephens' case Oct. 8 over whether federal civil rights law that bars job discrimination on the basis of sex protects transgender people. Other arguments that day deal with whether the same law covers sexual orientation. Amid their annual vigils for transgender homicide victims, trans-rights activists in the U.S. are trying to maintain long-term optimism even as many hard-won protections are under threat. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
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