Tribal park offers more exclusive encounter with history

Tribal park offers more exclusive encounter with history

This creation story and winter solstice marker date back to the Pueblo I period (750-900 A.D.), according to Ute Mountain Tribal Park guide Rick Hayes.
Guide Rick Hayes, center, has been conducting tours of the Ute Mountain Tribal Park for 20 years. The path connecting the cliff dwellings is the same one used by ancestral Puebloans. At left is Saul Medina, a history teacher in San Juan, Puerto Rico, and at right is Larry Means of Pine Grove.
The Tree House is one of more than 100 cliff dwellings archaeologists estimate are within the Ute Mountain Tribal Park’s bounds.
If you go

The Ute Mountain Tribal Park offers full- and half-day tours. Tours leave from the Ute Mountain Tribal Park Visitor Center, 22 miles south of Cortez at U.S. highways 491 and 160, and are accompanied by a park guide.
The tribal park generally is open from April through October.
Reservations are required and can be made by calling (800) 847-5485.

Tribal park offers more exclusive encounter with history

This creation story and winter solstice marker date back to the Pueblo I period (750-900 A.D.), according to Ute Mountain Tribal Park guide Rick Hayes.
Guide Rick Hayes, center, has been conducting tours of the Ute Mountain Tribal Park for 20 years. The path connecting the cliff dwellings is the same one used by ancestral Puebloans. At left is Saul Medina, a history teacher in San Juan, Puerto Rico, and at right is Larry Means of Pine Grove.
The Tree House is one of more than 100 cliff dwellings archaeologists estimate are within the Ute Mountain Tribal Park’s bounds.