Wildlife roam where U.S. once made nuclear and chemical arms

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Wildlife roam where U.S. once made nuclear and chemical arms

Animals roam where U.S. once made radioactive, chemical weapons
A sign hangs from a fence at the head of a trail at the Rocky Flats Wildlife Refuge in Arvada. The U.S. Energy Department manufactured plutonium triggers for nuclear warheads at Rocky Flats. Its rare tallgrass prairie is home to hundreds of species, including an endangered jumping mouse. Part of the site is open to the public.
White pelicans take flight over power lines near the Hanford Reach National Monument near Richland, Wash. A handful of sites where the United States manufactured and tested some of the most lethal weapons known to humankind are now peaceful havens for wildlife. But Hanford, where the cleanup has already cost at least $48 billion, may be the most troubled refuge of all.
This Aug. 6, 1945, photo from the Atomic Energy Commission shows one of the production areas at the Hanford Engineer Works, near Pasco in Richland, Wash., where plutonium for the atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, was developed.
The Columbia River flows under the Vernita Bridge and past the Hanford Reach National Monument, left, and the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, right beyond the bridge, near Richland, Wash. Washington state officials are worried that the Trump administration wants to reclassify millions of gallons of wastewater at Hanford from high-level radioactive to low-level, which could reduce cleanup standards and cut costs.
A boat motors along Columbia River near the Hanford Reach National Monument near Richland, Wash. A handful of sites where the United States manufactured and tested some of the most lethal weapons known to humankind are now peaceful havens for wildlife, where animals and habitats flourished on obsolete nuclear or chemical weapons complexes because the sites banned the public and most other intrusions for decades.
On Sept. 19, a worker holds a plutonium “button” inside a chamber using protective gloves at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant northwest of Denver. The U.S. Energy Department manufactured plutonium triggers for nuclear warheads at Rocky Flats. It had a long history of leaks, fires and environmental violations.

Wildlife roam where U.S. once made nuclear and chemical arms

A sign hangs from a fence at the head of a trail at the Rocky Flats Wildlife Refuge in Arvada. The U.S. Energy Department manufactured plutonium triggers for nuclear warheads at Rocky Flats. Its rare tallgrass prairie is home to hundreds of species, including an endangered jumping mouse. Part of the site is open to the public.
White pelicans take flight over power lines near the Hanford Reach National Monument near Richland, Wash. A handful of sites where the United States manufactured and tested some of the most lethal weapons known to humankind are now peaceful havens for wildlife. But Hanford, where the cleanup has already cost at least $48 billion, may be the most troubled refuge of all.
This Aug. 6, 1945, photo from the Atomic Energy Commission shows one of the production areas at the Hanford Engineer Works, near Pasco in Richland, Wash., where plutonium for the atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, was developed.
The Columbia River flows under the Vernita Bridge and past the Hanford Reach National Monument, left, and the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, right beyond the bridge, near Richland, Wash. Washington state officials are worried that the Trump administration wants to reclassify millions of gallons of wastewater at Hanford from high-level radioactive to low-level, which could reduce cleanup standards and cut costs.
A boat motors along Columbia River near the Hanford Reach National Monument near Richland, Wash. A handful of sites where the United States manufactured and tested some of the most lethal weapons known to humankind are now peaceful havens for wildlife, where animals and habitats flourished on obsolete nuclear or chemical weapons complexes because the sites banned the public and most other intrusions for decades.
On Sept. 19, a worker holds a plutonium “button” inside a chamber using protective gloves at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant northwest of Denver. The U.S. Energy Department manufactured plutonium triggers for nuclear warheads at Rocky Flats. It had a long history of leaks, fires and environmental violations.
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