Canadian Rockies by rail

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Canadian Rockies by rail

History Colorado explores the West, up north
Larger than Central Park in New York City, Vancouver’s Stanley Park is a 1,000-acre, remnant West Coast rain forest complete with First Nations totem poles, 17 miles of trails and half a million red cedar, Douglas fir and hemlock trees.
Three Canadian Mounties wear their traditional apple-red coats at the Calgary Stampede. A historic law enforcement tradition, the presence of the Mounties meant a significant difference between the history of the Canadian West and American West.
Televised nationally, the famous chuckwagon races at the Calgary Stampede are one of the most popular evening events. Grandstand seats sell out.
First Nations peoples have been a part of the Calgary Stampede since 1912. This year, 26 teepees were set up at the Elbow River Camp providing a place of quiet and peace amid the boisterous Stampede.
Vintage restored tractors from across Western Canada compete in a noisy but fun tractor pull at the Calgary Stampede.
Two days on the Rocky Mountaineer meant History Colorado Tours & Treks travelers saw fabulous scenery through the vistadome ceiling and railroad car’s full-length windows.
Canadian indigenous peoples have their own distinctive crafts including Blackfoot (Siksika, Piikani and Kainai) beadwork.
Vancouver, British Columbia’s dynamic, ever-changing skyline is a direct result of billions of dollars of Asian trade that flows through the city’s ports. For half of the city’s residents, English is not their native language.
History Colorado’s Tours & Treks brings Denver residents across the state, region and, for the first time, on international travel. Members enjoy discounts on travel packages and posing for group photos.
The Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise is one of the large historic hotels built by the Canadian Pacific Railroad to encourage long tourist stays. In the early 1900s, the railroad even imported Swiss mountain guides so visitors could spend weeks safely climbing Canadian glaciers and peaks.
Vancouver’s China Town, like its Gastown, is a thriving ethnic community and neighborhood in this bustling West Coast city.
Larger than Central Park in New York, Vancouver’s Stanley Park is a 1,000-acre, remnant West Coast rain forest complete with First Nations totem poles, 17 miles of trails, and half a million red cedar, Douglas Fir and hemlock trees.

Canadian Rockies by rail

Larger than Central Park in New York City, Vancouver’s Stanley Park is a 1,000-acre, remnant West Coast rain forest complete with First Nations totem poles, 17 miles of trails and half a million red cedar, Douglas fir and hemlock trees.
Three Canadian Mounties wear their traditional apple-red coats at the Calgary Stampede. A historic law enforcement tradition, the presence of the Mounties meant a significant difference between the history of the Canadian West and American West.
Televised nationally, the famous chuckwagon races at the Calgary Stampede are one of the most popular evening events. Grandstand seats sell out.
First Nations peoples have been a part of the Calgary Stampede since 1912. This year, 26 teepees were set up at the Elbow River Camp providing a place of quiet and peace amid the boisterous Stampede.
Vintage restored tractors from across Western Canada compete in a noisy but fun tractor pull at the Calgary Stampede.
Two days on the Rocky Mountaineer meant History Colorado Tours & Treks travelers saw fabulous scenery through the vistadome ceiling and railroad car’s full-length windows.
Canadian indigenous peoples have their own distinctive crafts including Blackfoot (Siksika, Piikani and Kainai) beadwork.
Vancouver, British Columbia’s dynamic, ever-changing skyline is a direct result of billions of dollars of Asian trade that flows through the city’s ports. For half of the city’s residents, English is not their native language.
History Colorado’s Tours & Treks brings Denver residents across the state, region and, for the first time, on international travel. Members enjoy discounts on travel packages and posing for group photos.
The Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise is one of the large historic hotels built by the Canadian Pacific Railroad to encourage long tourist stays. In the early 1900s, the railroad even imported Swiss mountain guides so visitors could spend weeks safely climbing Canadian glaciers and peaks.
Vancouver’s China Town, like its Gastown, is a thriving ethnic community and neighborhood in this bustling West Coast city.
Larger than Central Park in New York, Vancouver’s Stanley Park is a 1,000-acre, remnant West Coast rain forest complete with First Nations totem poles, 17 miles of trails, and half a million red cedar, Douglas Fir and hemlock trees.