Glenn Greenwald becomes focus of Brazil press freedom debate

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Glenn Greenwald becomes focus of Brazil press freedom debate

In this July 10, 2019 photo, U.S. journalist Glenn Greenwald checks his news website at his home in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Greenwald, an attorney-turned-journalist who has long been a free-speech advocate, has found himself at the center of the first major test of press freedom under Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro, who took office on Jan. 1 and has openly expressed nostalgia for Brazil’s 1964-1985 military dictatorship, a period when newspapers were censored and some journalists tortured. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
In this April 24, 2019 handout photo, congresswoman Katia Sastre, an ally of President Jair Bolsonaro, talks with then Secretary of Government Minister Alberto dos Santos Cruz, at Congress in Brasilia, Brazil. Several weeks after publishing explosive reports on a top member of Brazil’s far-right government, U.S. journalist Glenn Greenwald sat before a congressional committee as Sastre shouted; “Who should be judged, convicted and in prison is the journalist!”(Wilson Dias/Agencia Brasil via AP)
FILE - In this Nov. 26, 2018 file photo, newly-appointed appointed Justice Minister speaks to the press as he arrives to his team's transition office in Brasilia, Brazil. Glenn Greenwald’s The Intercept news website last month alleged political bias by Moro and prosecutors in a sweeping corruption investigation that brought down many of the country’s business and political elite and turned Moro into a hero to many. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres, File)
In this May 29, 2019 handout photo provided by Agencia Brasil, Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro listens as Carla Zambelli whispers into his ear during a meeting at Congress, in Brasilia, Brazil. Several weeks after publishing explosive reports on a top member of Brazil’s far-right government, U.S. journalist Glenn Greenwald sat before the Human Rights and Minorities Commission. During the June 25 hearing Zambelli told Greenwald: "If you don't prove this information, it is fake and you're a liar. If it's true, then you're a criminal because you hacked someone's phone." (Marcelo Camargo/Agencia Brasil via AP)
In this July 10, 2019 photo, U.S. journalist Glenn Greenwald speaks during an interview at his home in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A conservative website reported that federal police have requested financial regulators to investigate Greenwald's finances, weeks after publishing explosive reports about a key member of Brazil’s far-right government. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
In this July 10, 2019 photo, U.S. journalist Glenn Greenwald checks his news website, at his home in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Being the center of controversy is nothing new for Greenwald, who was part of a team at The Guardian newspaper that won a Pulitzer for reports about government surveillance programs based on classified documents disclosed by Edward Snowden. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
FILE - In this July 7, 2019 file photo, Brazil's Justice Minister Sergio Moro, flashing a "vee" for victory, and Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro, smile as they wait for the start of the Copa America title match between Brazil and Peru, at the Maracana stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. U.S. journalist Glenn Greenwald’s website published explosive reports on Moro. Bolsonaro has defended his justice minister, saying what Moro did for Brazil as an anti-corruption judge is “priceless.” (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano, File)
In this July 10, 2019 photo, U.S. journalist Glenn Greenwald, accompanied by his dogs Pulo, left, and Kane, sits during an interview at his home in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Several weeks after publishing explosive reports on a top member of Brazil’s far-right government, the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and his Brazilian husband say they have been receiving detailed death threats, calls for his deportation and homophobic comments in an increasingly hostile political environment. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
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