Made in China? Iceland's sweater-knitters are unhappy

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Made in China? Iceland's sweater-knitters are unhappy

In this photo taken on Friday, 3 May, 2019, sales assistant Nuria Medina Marin gestures to a 'lopi' sweater in the Nordic store in Reykjavik. Trouble is rattling one of Iceland’s most distinctive industries: the production of the thick, hand-knitted “lopi” sweaters adored by tourists and worn with pride by locals. The individually produced, very warm sweaters have become a symbol of Iceland. But increasingly the local wool is being shipped to the cheaper labor market of China, where the sweaters are hand-knitted and then sent back for sale on the North Atlantic island. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason)
In this photo taken on Friday, 3 May, 2019, sales assistant Nuria Medina Marin folds a 'lopi' sweater in the Nordic store in Reykjavik. Trouble is rattling one of Iceland’s most distinctive industries: the production of the thick, hand-knitted “lopi” sweaters adored by tourists and worn with pride by locals. The individually produced, very warm sweaters have become a symbol of Iceland. But increasingly the local wool is being shipped to the cheaper labor market of China, where the sweaters are hand-knitted and then sent back for sale on the North Atlantic island. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, April 30, 2019, Thuridur Einarsdottir, founder of the Handknitting Association of Iceland, folds a 'lopi' sweater in Reykjavik. Trouble is rattling one of Iceland’s most distinctive industries: the production of the thick, hand-knitted “lopi” sweaters adored by tourists and worn with pride by locals. The individually produced, very warm sweaters have become a symbol of Iceland. But increasingly the local wool is being shipped to the cheaper labor market of China, where the sweaters are hand-knitted and then sent back for sale on the North Atlantic island. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, April 30, 2019, an American tourist tries on an Icelandic "lopi" sweater knitted at Handknitting Association of Iceland in Reykjavik. Trouble is rattling one of Iceland’s most distinctive industries: the production of the thick, hand-knitted “lopi” sweaters adored by tourists and worn with pride by locals. The individually produced, very warm sweaters have become a symbol of Iceland. But increasingly the local wool is being shipped to the cheaper labor market of China, where the sweaters are hand-knitted and then sent back for sale on the North Atlantic island. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason)
In this photo taken on Friday, 3 May, 2019, Bjarni Jonsson, owner of the Nordic store, poses for a photograph in Reykjavik. Trouble is rattling one of Iceland’s most distinctive industries: the production of the thick, hand-knitted “lopi” sweaters adored by tourists and worn with pride by locals. The individually produced, very warm sweaters have become a symbol of Iceland. But increasingly the local wool is being shipped to the cheaper labor market of China, where the sweaters are hand-knitted and then sent back for sale on the North Atlantic island. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason)
In this photo taken on Wednesday, April 24, 2019, Asgerdur Jonasdottir, a worker at the Istex wool factory, prepares a large spinning machine with green "lopi" yarn, in Reykjavik. Trouble is rattling one of Iceland’s most distinctive industries: the production of the thick, hand-knitted “lopi” sweaters adored by tourists and worn with pride by locals. The individually produced, very warm sweaters have become a symbol of Iceland. But increasingly the local wool is being shipped to the cheaper labor market of China, where the sweaters are hand-knitted and then sent back for sale on the North Atlantic island. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason)
FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2009 file photo, a farmer wearing a traditional 'lopi' wool sweater rounds up sheep in Skeidin, South Iceland. Trouble is rattling one of Iceland’s most distinctive industries: the production of the thick, hand-knitted “lopi” sweaters adored by tourists and worn with pride by locals. The individually produced, very warm sweaters have become a symbol of Iceland. But increasingly the local wool is being shipped to the cheaper labor market of China, where the sweaters are hand-knitted and then sent back for sale on the North Atlantic island. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason, file)
In this photo taken on Wednesday, April 24, 2019, a worker at the Istex wool factory in pushes colored wool for further processing, in Reykjavik. Trouble is rattling one of Iceland’s most distinctive industries: the production of the thick, hand-knitted “lopi” sweaters adored by tourists and worn with pride by locals. The individually produced, very warm sweaters have become a symbol of Iceland. But increasingly the local wool is being shipped to the cheaper labor market of China, where the sweaters are hand-knitted and then sent back for sale on the North Atlantic island. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason)
FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2009 file photo, farmers, most wearing traditional 'lopi' wool sweaters, round up sheep in Skeidin, South Iceland. Trouble is rattling one of Iceland’s most distinctive industries: the production of the thick, hand-knitted “lopi” sweaters adored by tourists and worn with pride by locals. The individually produced, very warm sweaters have become a symbol of Iceland. But increasingly the local wool is being shipped to the cheaper labor market of China, where the sweaters are hand-knitted and then sent back for sale on the North Atlantic island. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason, file)

Made in China? Iceland's sweater-knitters are unhappy

In this photo taken on Friday, 3 May, 2019, sales assistant Nuria Medina Marin gestures to a 'lopi' sweater in the Nordic store in Reykjavik. Trouble is rattling one of Iceland’s most distinctive industries: the production of the thick, hand-knitted “lopi” sweaters adored by tourists and worn with pride by locals. The individually produced, very warm sweaters have become a symbol of Iceland. But increasingly the local wool is being shipped to the cheaper labor market of China, where the sweaters are hand-knitted and then sent back for sale on the North Atlantic island. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason)
In this photo taken on Friday, 3 May, 2019, sales assistant Nuria Medina Marin folds a 'lopi' sweater in the Nordic store in Reykjavik. Trouble is rattling one of Iceland’s most distinctive industries: the production of the thick, hand-knitted “lopi” sweaters adored by tourists and worn with pride by locals. The individually produced, very warm sweaters have become a symbol of Iceland. But increasingly the local wool is being shipped to the cheaper labor market of China, where the sweaters are hand-knitted and then sent back for sale on the North Atlantic island. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, April 30, 2019, Thuridur Einarsdottir, founder of the Handknitting Association of Iceland, folds a 'lopi' sweater in Reykjavik. Trouble is rattling one of Iceland’s most distinctive industries: the production of the thick, hand-knitted “lopi” sweaters adored by tourists and worn with pride by locals. The individually produced, very warm sweaters have become a symbol of Iceland. But increasingly the local wool is being shipped to the cheaper labor market of China, where the sweaters are hand-knitted and then sent back for sale on the North Atlantic island. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, April 30, 2019, an American tourist tries on an Icelandic "lopi" sweater knitted at Handknitting Association of Iceland in Reykjavik. Trouble is rattling one of Iceland’s most distinctive industries: the production of the thick, hand-knitted “lopi” sweaters adored by tourists and worn with pride by locals. The individually produced, very warm sweaters have become a symbol of Iceland. But increasingly the local wool is being shipped to the cheaper labor market of China, where the sweaters are hand-knitted and then sent back for sale on the North Atlantic island. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason)
In this photo taken on Friday, 3 May, 2019, Bjarni Jonsson, owner of the Nordic store, poses for a photograph in Reykjavik. Trouble is rattling one of Iceland’s most distinctive industries: the production of the thick, hand-knitted “lopi” sweaters adored by tourists and worn with pride by locals. The individually produced, very warm sweaters have become a symbol of Iceland. But increasingly the local wool is being shipped to the cheaper labor market of China, where the sweaters are hand-knitted and then sent back for sale on the North Atlantic island. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason)
In this photo taken on Wednesday, April 24, 2019, Asgerdur Jonasdottir, a worker at the Istex wool factory, prepares a large spinning machine with green "lopi" yarn, in Reykjavik. Trouble is rattling one of Iceland’s most distinctive industries: the production of the thick, hand-knitted “lopi” sweaters adored by tourists and worn with pride by locals. The individually produced, very warm sweaters have become a symbol of Iceland. But increasingly the local wool is being shipped to the cheaper labor market of China, where the sweaters are hand-knitted and then sent back for sale on the North Atlantic island. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason)
FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2009 file photo, a farmer wearing a traditional 'lopi' wool sweater rounds up sheep in Skeidin, South Iceland. Trouble is rattling one of Iceland’s most distinctive industries: the production of the thick, hand-knitted “lopi” sweaters adored by tourists and worn with pride by locals. The individually produced, very warm sweaters have become a symbol of Iceland. But increasingly the local wool is being shipped to the cheaper labor market of China, where the sweaters are hand-knitted and then sent back for sale on the North Atlantic island. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason, file)
In this photo taken on Wednesday, April 24, 2019, a worker at the Istex wool factory in pushes colored wool for further processing, in Reykjavik. Trouble is rattling one of Iceland’s most distinctive industries: the production of the thick, hand-knitted “lopi” sweaters adored by tourists and worn with pride by locals. The individually produced, very warm sweaters have become a symbol of Iceland. But increasingly the local wool is being shipped to the cheaper labor market of China, where the sweaters are hand-knitted and then sent back for sale on the North Atlantic island. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason)
FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2009 file photo, farmers, most wearing traditional 'lopi' wool sweaters, round up sheep in Skeidin, South Iceland. Trouble is rattling one of Iceland’s most distinctive industries: the production of the thick, hand-knitted “lopi” sweaters adored by tourists and worn with pride by locals. The individually produced, very warm sweaters have become a symbol of Iceland. But increasingly the local wool is being shipped to the cheaper labor market of China, where the sweaters are hand-knitted and then sent back for sale on the North Atlantic island. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason, file)
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