'I'm an American': Deported adoptee struggles in Brazil

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'I'm an American': Deported adoptee struggles in Brazil

In this April 11, 2019, photo, Paul Fernando Schreiner, right, sits next to Segisfredo Silva Vanderlai, a pastor who has been lodging Schreiner since a few weeks after his arrival, in Niteroi, Brazil. After being adopted by an American family and living in the U.S. for more than 30 years, Schreiner was deported to Brazil. His removal illustrates the increasingly hard line the Trump administration is taking with legal immigrants that are deportable because of criminal records. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
In this May 8, 2019, photo, Roger and Rosanna Schreiner of Seward Neb., describe during an interview with The Associated Press, the circumstances that led to the deportation of their adopted son Paul to Brazil. “He shouldn’t have to suffer a second time,” Rosanna Schreiner said through tears. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
This undated photo provided by Roger and Rosanna Schreiner shows their adopted son Paul Fernando Schreiner, top right, along with the rest of the Schreiner family. Schreiner was never naturalized a U.S. citizen but lived as an American for 30 years before being deported to Brazil. He was legally adopted at age 5, had a Nebraska birth certificate, a Social Security number and paid taxes. (Courtesy of the Schreiner Family via AP)
This undated photo provided by Roger and Rosanna Schreiner shows their adopted son Paul Fernando Schreiner posing for a photo with a puzzle. After being adopted by an American family and living in the U.S. more than 30 years, Paul Fernando Schreiner was deported to Brazil. His removal illustrates the increasingly hard line the Trump administration is taking with legal immigrants that are deportable because of criminal records. (Courtesy of the Schreiner Family via AP)
In this April 11, 2019, photo, Paul Fernando Schreiner stands in front of the house where he is living in Niteroi, Brazil. For adoption groups, forcibly removing people like Schreiner, regardless of the situation, violates basic human rights and amounts to triple jeopardy: adoptees were abandoned as children in their home countries, are abandoned a second time by their adopted country and then are sent to a place where they have no family, don't speak the language and have few skills to survive. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
In this April 11, 2019, photo, Segisfredo Silva Vanderlai, a pastor who has been lodging Paul Fernando Schreiner after he was deported, walks in front of his house in Niteroi, Brazil. “I don’t understand how somebody who had been living in the U.S. can be abandoned like this,” said Vanderlai (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
In this April 11, 2019, photo, Paul Fernando Schreiner walks to a local supermarket in Niteroi, Brazil. Conversations are rare for Schreiner, as he speaks no Portuguese and few people here speak anything but Portuguese. Inside his head, every day there is a fight against boredom, loneliness and desperation. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
In this April 11, 2019, photo, Paul Fernando Schreiner uses his laptop in the room where he sleeps, in Niteroi, Brazil. The heavy, dense air of this city across the bay from Rio de Janeiro feels insufferable, nothing like the dry heat of Phoenix, Ariz., where he had been living when he was deported last year. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
In this April 11, 2019, photo, Paul Fernando Schreiner speaks during an interview in Niteroi, Brazil ,after being deported from the U.S. nearly a year ago. "I am anything but Brazilian," said Schreiner, "I am an American." (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
In this April 11, 2019, photo, Paul Fernando Schreiner speaks on the phone from Niteroi, Brazil, with his adoptive father in the U.S., Roger Schreiner. Nearly a year since being deported to Brazil, Schreiner is still in limbo. He has been unable to get a Brazilian birth certificate, an identification card or a tax ID number needed to work. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
In this April 11, 2019, photo, Paul Fernando Schreiner is reflected on a screen as he speaks on the phone with his father, Roger Schreiner. After being adopted by an American family and living in the U.S. more than 30 years, Schreiner was deported to Brazil, where he is living in the city of Niteroi. He speaks no Portuguese, has no family and few prospects. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

'I'm an American': Deported adoptee struggles in Brazil

In this April 11, 2019, photo, Paul Fernando Schreiner, right, sits next to Segisfredo Silva Vanderlai, a pastor who has been lodging Schreiner since a few weeks after his arrival, in Niteroi, Brazil. After being adopted by an American family and living in the U.S. for more than 30 years, Schreiner was deported to Brazil. His removal illustrates the increasingly hard line the Trump administration is taking with legal immigrants that are deportable because of criminal records. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
In this May 8, 2019, photo, Roger and Rosanna Schreiner of Seward Neb., describe during an interview with The Associated Press, the circumstances that led to the deportation of their adopted son Paul to Brazil. “He shouldn’t have to suffer a second time,” Rosanna Schreiner said through tears. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
This undated photo provided by Roger and Rosanna Schreiner shows their adopted son Paul Fernando Schreiner, top right, along with the rest of the Schreiner family. Schreiner was never naturalized a U.S. citizen but lived as an American for 30 years before being deported to Brazil. He was legally adopted at age 5, had a Nebraska birth certificate, a Social Security number and paid taxes. (Courtesy of the Schreiner Family via AP)
This undated photo provided by Roger and Rosanna Schreiner shows their adopted son Paul Fernando Schreiner posing for a photo with a puzzle. After being adopted by an American family and living in the U.S. more than 30 years, Paul Fernando Schreiner was deported to Brazil. His removal illustrates the increasingly hard line the Trump administration is taking with legal immigrants that are deportable because of criminal records. (Courtesy of the Schreiner Family via AP)
In this April 11, 2019, photo, Paul Fernando Schreiner stands in front of the house where he is living in Niteroi, Brazil. For adoption groups, forcibly removing people like Schreiner, regardless of the situation, violates basic human rights and amounts to triple jeopardy: adoptees were abandoned as children in their home countries, are abandoned a second time by their adopted country and then are sent to a place where they have no family, don't speak the language and have few skills to survive. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
In this April 11, 2019, photo, Segisfredo Silva Vanderlai, a pastor who has been lodging Paul Fernando Schreiner after he was deported, walks in front of his house in Niteroi, Brazil. “I don’t understand how somebody who had been living in the U.S. can be abandoned like this,” said Vanderlai (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
In this April 11, 2019, photo, Paul Fernando Schreiner walks to a local supermarket in Niteroi, Brazil. Conversations are rare for Schreiner, as he speaks no Portuguese and few people here speak anything but Portuguese. Inside his head, every day there is a fight against boredom, loneliness and desperation. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
In this April 11, 2019, photo, Paul Fernando Schreiner uses his laptop in the room where he sleeps, in Niteroi, Brazil. The heavy, dense air of this city across the bay from Rio de Janeiro feels insufferable, nothing like the dry heat of Phoenix, Ariz., where he had been living when he was deported last year. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
In this April 11, 2019, photo, Paul Fernando Schreiner speaks during an interview in Niteroi, Brazil ,after being deported from the U.S. nearly a year ago. "I am anything but Brazilian," said Schreiner, "I am an American." (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
In this April 11, 2019, photo, Paul Fernando Schreiner speaks on the phone from Niteroi, Brazil, with his adoptive father in the U.S., Roger Schreiner. Nearly a year since being deported to Brazil, Schreiner is still in limbo. He has been unable to get a Brazilian birth certificate, an identification card or a tax ID number needed to work. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
In this April 11, 2019, photo, Paul Fernando Schreiner is reflected on a screen as he speaks on the phone with his father, Roger Schreiner. After being adopted by an American family and living in the U.S. more than 30 years, Schreiner was deported to Brazil, where he is living in the city of Niteroi. He speaks no Portuguese, has no family and few prospects. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
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