Clotilda: Last US slave ship discovered among gators, snakes

News

Clotilda: Last US slave ship discovered among gators, snakes

In this undated image released by SEARCH Inc. in May 2019, archaeological survey teams work to locate the slave ship Clotilda, in delta waters north of Mobile Bay, Ala. Remains of the schooner were identified and verified near Mobile after months of assessment, a statement by the Alabama Historical Commission said. (Daniel Fiore/SEARCH, Inc. via AP)
In this undated image released by SEARCH Inc., maritime archaeologist Kyle Lent examines a wooden plank from the hull of Clotilda, in delta waters north of Mobile Bay, Ala. Remains of the Gulf schooner Clotilda were identified and verified near Mobile after months of assessment, a statement by the Alabama Historical Commission said. (Daniel Fiore/SEARCH, Inc. via AP)
In this undated image released by SEARCH Inc. in May 2019, archaeologists examine a loose piece of the wrecked Gulf schooner Clotilda, in delta waters north of Mobile Bay, Ala. The old wooden ship hull didn't look like much when researchers first saw it: just broken, waterlogged boards and a few pieces of rusted metal, all stuck in the muddy bottom of a bug-infested Alabama bayou where an alligator and poisonous water moccasins swam nearby. (Daniel Fiore/SEARCH, Inc. via AP)
In this undated image released by SEARCH Inc. in May 2019, artifacts recovered from the shipwreck of Gulf schooner Clotilda are bagged, in delta waters north of Mobile Bay, Ala. Laboratory analysis showed the spike to be made of pure iron common to pre-1870s iron working. (Daniel Fiore/SEARCH, Inc. via AP)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019, file photo, the flags of the nations of Benin and Togo, the west African homes of the survivors of the slave ship Clotilda, remain on display on a monument at what was the Africatown Welcome Center in Mobile, Ala. The center was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and hasn't been rebuilt. On Wednesday, May 22, 2019, authorities said that researchers have located the wreck of Clotilda, the last ship known to bring enslaved people from Africa to the United States. (AP Photo/Julie Bennett, File)
FILE - This Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019, file photo, shows the family tree of Lorna Gail Woods, a direct descendant of slave ship Clotilda survivor Charlie Lewis, in Africatown in Mobile, Ala. Woods grew up in Africatown and keeps a makeshift museum of the area's history. On Wednesday, May 22, 2019, authorities said that researchers have located the wreck of Clotilda, the last ship known to bring enslaved people from Africa to the United States. (AP Photo/Julie Bennett, File)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019, file photo, Old Plateau Cemetery, the final resting place for many who spent their lives in Africatown, stands in need of upkeep near Mobile, Ala. Many of the survivors of the slave ship Clotilda's voyage are buried here among the trees. On Wednesday, May 22, 2019, authorities said that researchers have located the wreck of Clotilda, the last ship known to bring enslaved people from Africa to the United States. (AP Photo/Julie Bennett, File)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019, file photo, Joycelyn Davis, a direct descendant of slave ship Clotilda survivor Charlie Lewis, stands for a portrait at the community center in Africatown in Mobile, Ala. On Wednesday, May 22, 2019, authorities said that researchers have located the wreck of Clotilda, the last ship known to bring enslaved people from Africa to the United States. (AP Photo/Julie Bennett, File)

Clotilda: Last US slave ship discovered among gators, snakes

In this undated image released by SEARCH Inc. in May 2019, archaeological survey teams work to locate the slave ship Clotilda, in delta waters north of Mobile Bay, Ala. Remains of the schooner were identified and verified near Mobile after months of assessment, a statement by the Alabama Historical Commission said. (Daniel Fiore/SEARCH, Inc. via AP)
In this undated image released by SEARCH Inc., maritime archaeologist Kyle Lent examines a wooden plank from the hull of Clotilda, in delta waters north of Mobile Bay, Ala. Remains of the Gulf schooner Clotilda were identified and verified near Mobile after months of assessment, a statement by the Alabama Historical Commission said. (Daniel Fiore/SEARCH, Inc. via AP)
In this undated image released by SEARCH Inc. in May 2019, archaeologists examine a loose piece of the wrecked Gulf schooner Clotilda, in delta waters north of Mobile Bay, Ala. The old wooden ship hull didn't look like much when researchers first saw it: just broken, waterlogged boards and a few pieces of rusted metal, all stuck in the muddy bottom of a bug-infested Alabama bayou where an alligator and poisonous water moccasins swam nearby. (Daniel Fiore/SEARCH, Inc. via AP)
In this undated image released by SEARCH Inc. in May 2019, artifacts recovered from the shipwreck of Gulf schooner Clotilda are bagged, in delta waters north of Mobile Bay, Ala. Laboratory analysis showed the spike to be made of pure iron common to pre-1870s iron working. (Daniel Fiore/SEARCH, Inc. via AP)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019, file photo, the flags of the nations of Benin and Togo, the west African homes of the survivors of the slave ship Clotilda, remain on display on a monument at what was the Africatown Welcome Center in Mobile, Ala. The center was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and hasn't been rebuilt. On Wednesday, May 22, 2019, authorities said that researchers have located the wreck of Clotilda, the last ship known to bring enslaved people from Africa to the United States. (AP Photo/Julie Bennett, File)
FILE - This Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019, file photo, shows the family tree of Lorna Gail Woods, a direct descendant of slave ship Clotilda survivor Charlie Lewis, in Africatown in Mobile, Ala. Woods grew up in Africatown and keeps a makeshift museum of the area's history. On Wednesday, May 22, 2019, authorities said that researchers have located the wreck of Clotilda, the last ship known to bring enslaved people from Africa to the United States. (AP Photo/Julie Bennett, File)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019, file photo, Old Plateau Cemetery, the final resting place for many who spent their lives in Africatown, stands in need of upkeep near Mobile, Ala. Many of the survivors of the slave ship Clotilda's voyage are buried here among the trees. On Wednesday, May 22, 2019, authorities said that researchers have located the wreck of Clotilda, the last ship known to bring enslaved people from Africa to the United States. (AP Photo/Julie Bennett, File)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019, file photo, Joycelyn Davis, a direct descendant of slave ship Clotilda survivor Charlie Lewis, stands for a portrait at the community center in Africatown in Mobile, Ala. On Wednesday, May 22, 2019, authorities said that researchers have located the wreck of Clotilda, the last ship known to bring enslaved people from Africa to the United States. (AP Photo/Julie Bennett, File)