Ancient history gets new digs

Ancient history gets new digs

New Mesa Verde Visitor Center brings it all to one place
Did you know?

In addition to displays, artifacts and maps, the Mesa Verde National Park Visitor and Research Center is full of interesting facts about the park.
It’s not actually a mesa (flat) but a cuesta, with a 7 percent grade.
That grade makes

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The grand opening of the Mesa Verde National Park Visitor and Research Center will take place at 10 a.m. Thursday. The center is off U.S. Highway 160 before the entrance to the park. Gov. John Hickenlooper will be among the dignitaries in attendance

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Ancient history gets new digs

‘THE ANCIENT ONES’ by Edward J. Fraughton, graces the walkway to the new Mesa Verde Visitor and Research Center. The sculpture, of a climbing ancestral Puebloan man, was one of three purchased for the center by the Mesa Verde Foundation.
Park Point is visible from a window in the rotunda of the new Mesa Verde Visitor and Research Center, which will hold its grand opening Thursday.
Bill Strong from Lynchburg, Va., takes a moment to enjoy “In the Moment,” Joe Cajera Jr.’s sculpture of a storyteller that sits in the rotunda of the new Mesa Verde Visitor and Research Center. Strong said he’s been on the road since April 12 visiting America’s national parks.
A 20-foot-tall sculpture of an ancestral Puebloan climbing a cliff face elicits admiration and a photo opportunity for visitors from Germany arriving at the new Mesa Verde Visitor and Research Center. The sculpture, called “The Ancient Ones” by Edward J. Fraughton, was one of three purchased for the center by the Mesa Verde Foundation.
An interactive, three-dimensional map at the new Mesa Verde Visitor Center allows guests to see everything from where the main ruins are to the locations of the Civilian Conservation Corps camps from the Depression era and areas that contain old-growth piñon groves. To the left is a metal map that allows visually impaired visitors to get a sense of the park’s topography.
Tara Travis, curator of the Mesa Verde National Park collections, will have spent three solid years packing and moving the collection of about 3 million artifacts when the move to the new Mesa Verde Visitor and Research Center is complete in the fall. The items will be stored in the new repository, which includes cabinets with microclimates to preserve fragile items.
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