Research efforts hone in on Hermosa Creek

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Research efforts hone in on Hermosa Creek

Once a reliable tributary, creek now an area of concern
Scott Roberts, left, water programs director and aquatic ecologist with Mountain Studies Institute, and Ashley Rust, research faculty with Colorado School of Mines, place a probe for water-quality monitoring Friday in Hermosa Creek. The probe is on loan from the West Fork Complex Fire, where it was used for the same purpose after the fires near Wolf Creek Pass in 2013.
Steven Reeves, an incoming graduate student at Colorado School of Mines, and Ashley Rust, research faculty with CSM, along with staff from Mountain Studies Institute place a probe for water-quality monitoring Friday in Hermosa Creek. The probe is on loan from the West Fork Complex Fire, where it was used after the 2013 fires near Wolf Creek Pass.
Steven Reeves, an incoming graduate student at Colorado School of Mines, and Ashley Rust, research faculty with CSM, along with staff from Mountain Studies Institute place a probe to monitor water quality Friday in Hermosa Creek. The probe is on loan from the West Fork Complex Fire, where it was used after the fires near Wolf Creek Pass in 2013.
Mountain Studies Institute placed a probe to monitor water quality Friday in Hermosa Creek.
An aerial photo taken Oct. 19 shows the 416 Fire burn scar that reaches into the Hermosa Creek watershed north of Durango. The burn scar is responsible for sending debris into Hermosa Creek, a tributary of the Animas River.
About 50 fish lie dead and dying in a small portion of the Animas River in July north of Durango.

Research efforts hone in on Hermosa Creek

Scott Roberts, left, water programs director and aquatic ecologist with Mountain Studies Institute, and Ashley Rust, research faculty with Colorado School of Mines, place a probe for water-quality monitoring Friday in Hermosa Creek. The probe is on loan from the West Fork Complex Fire, where it was used for the same purpose after the fires near Wolf Creek Pass in 2013.
Steven Reeves, an incoming graduate student at Colorado School of Mines, and Ashley Rust, research faculty with CSM, along with staff from Mountain Studies Institute place a probe for water-quality monitoring Friday in Hermosa Creek. The probe is on loan from the West Fork Complex Fire, where it was used after the 2013 fires near Wolf Creek Pass.
Steven Reeves, an incoming graduate student at Colorado School of Mines, and Ashley Rust, research faculty with CSM, along with staff from Mountain Studies Institute place a probe to monitor water quality Friday in Hermosa Creek. The probe is on loan from the West Fork Complex Fire, where it was used after the fires near Wolf Creek Pass in 2013.
Mountain Studies Institute placed a probe to monitor water quality Friday in Hermosa Creek.
An aerial photo taken Oct. 19 shows the 416 Fire burn scar that reaches into the Hermosa Creek watershed north of Durango. The burn scar is responsible for sending debris into Hermosa Creek, a tributary of the Animas River.
About 50 fish lie dead and dying in a small portion of the Animas River in July north of Durango.