Roosevelt in Colorado: Stained glass honors president who cherished the West

Roosevelt in Colorado: Stained glass honors president who cherished the West

Stained glass honors president who cherished the West
In this painting by Jack Roberts, President Theodore Roosevelt runs after a bear during his famous April 1905 bear hunt in Colorado. In actuality, Roosevelt probably would have stayed on his horse.
Cowboys flagged down President Theodore Roosevelt’s train as it crossed eastern Colorado near Hugo. They urged him to join them in a cowboy breakfast. Never one to turn down a steak, Roosevelt ate with them before steaming off to give many speeches across the state.
This is a detail of a standard Christian symbol found in many Protestant churches and in the Roosevelt Window. Though the Rifle Branch Library brochure for the window says it was made in Denver, another story is that the glass may have come from the Chicago firm of Flanagan & Biedenweg, which specialized in “Ecclesiastical Art in Memorial Windows.” The Rev. Horace Mann, who commissioned the window, offered a congratulatory “thank you” to the firm printed in its 1909 catalog.
Cowboys flagged down President Theodore Roosevelt’s train as it crossed eastern Colorado near Hugo. They urged him to join them in a cowboy breakfast. Never one to turn down a steak, Roosevelt ate with them before steaming off to give many speeches across the state.
A detail of the Roosevelt stained glass window includes the phrase, “Our Country, Theodore Roosevelt President.” Roosevelt was wildly popular in Colorado, and thousands of residents turned out to see him as his trains crossed the state north to south and east to west.
The Rev. Horace Mann, who commissioned the Roosevelt Window, took an historic photo of President Theodore Roosevelt in hunting garb addressing a Sunday church service at the Blue School south of Rifle. The photograph is reproduced in this painting by Jack Roberts in the collections of the Museum of Western Colorado in Grand Junction.
In this pensive portrait with pince-nez, Theodore Roosevelt looks forward into the future. He was the nation’s greatest conservation president, setting aside 230 million acres of public land between 1901 and 1909.
Cowboys flagged down President Theodore Roosevelt’s train as it crossed eastern Colorado near Hugo. They urged him to join them in a cowboy breakfast. Never one to turn down a steak, Roosevelt ate with them before steaming off to give speeches across the state.
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Fort Lewis College professor Andrew Gulliford speaks with KDNK Community Radio in Carbondale about President Theodore Roosevelt’s history in Western Colorado: https://bit.ly/2E8DAbh.

Roosevelt in Colorado: Stained glass honors president who cherished the West

In this painting by Jack Roberts, President Theodore Roosevelt runs after a bear during his famous April 1905 bear hunt in Colorado. In actuality, Roosevelt probably would have stayed on his horse.
Cowboys flagged down President Theodore Roosevelt’s train as it crossed eastern Colorado near Hugo. They urged him to join them in a cowboy breakfast. Never one to turn down a steak, Roosevelt ate with them before steaming off to give many speeches across the state.
This is a detail of a standard Christian symbol found in many Protestant churches and in the Roosevelt Window. Though the Rifle Branch Library brochure for the window says it was made in Denver, another story is that the glass may have come from the Chicago firm of Flanagan & Biedenweg, which specialized in “Ecclesiastical Art in Memorial Windows.” The Rev. Horace Mann, who commissioned the window, offered a congratulatory “thank you” to the firm printed in its 1909 catalog.
Cowboys flagged down President Theodore Roosevelt’s train as it crossed eastern Colorado near Hugo. They urged him to join them in a cowboy breakfast. Never one to turn down a steak, Roosevelt ate with them before steaming off to give many speeches across the state.
A detail of the Roosevelt stained glass window includes the phrase, “Our Country, Theodore Roosevelt President.” Roosevelt was wildly popular in Colorado, and thousands of residents turned out to see him as his trains crossed the state north to south and east to west.
The Rev. Horace Mann, who commissioned the Roosevelt Window, took an historic photo of President Theodore Roosevelt in hunting garb addressing a Sunday church service at the Blue School south of Rifle. The photograph is reproduced in this painting by Jack Roberts in the collections of the Museum of Western Colorado in Grand Junction.
In this pensive portrait with pince-nez, Theodore Roosevelt looks forward into the future. He was the nation’s greatest conservation president, setting aside 230 million acres of public land between 1901 and 1909.
Cowboys flagged down President Theodore Roosevelt’s train as it crossed eastern Colorado near Hugo. They urged him to join them in a cowboy breakfast. Never one to turn down a steak, Roosevelt ate with them before steaming off to give speeches across the state.

Roosevelt in Colorado: Stained glass honors president who cherished the West

After the assassination of President William McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt became the youngest president ever in the White House.

Roosevelt in Colorado: Stained glass honors president who cherished the West

Jack Roberts painted President Theodore Roosevelt admiring Colorado’s mountain scenery during his famous spring bear hunt. Roosevelt said the West changed his life. Understanding the West and promoting conservation opened the door to the White House for him.

Roosevelt in Colorado: Stained glass honors president who cherished the West

This phrase from the Roosevelt Window, “All men up not some men down,” drew enthusiastic applause when Theodore Roosevelt used it in a Colorado speech.

Roosevelt in Colorado: Stained glass honors president who cherished the West

The Roosevelt Window, originally designed for a Christian church, is now an important part of the Rifle Branch Library. President Theodore Roosevelt hunted bears south of Silt in April 1905, and this magnificent stained glass window was commissioned by local minister Rev. Horace Mann.