The Virgin never leaves Hispanic roadside shrines dot the mystic West

The Virgin never leaves Hispanic roadside shrines dot the mystic West

At a shrine to La Virgin Maria just north of Abiquiu, N.M., folk artists created a stone grotto where the Virgin stands and is covered with gifts of necklaces. Other offerings are left at her feet, including small statues of Jesus, the Virgin of Guadalupe and votive candles.
A cross with a wreath of brambles is silhouetted against the sky at La Virgin Maria shrine north of Abiquiu, N.M. Nearby wooden crosses include names and dates of family members who have died. On one such cross a baby’s plastic pacifier is wired to the wood.
Wooden crosses at Hispanic roadside shrines receive all kinds of adornments and offerings, including this cross accented with yellow highway reflectors.
Multiple crosses lean against the stone grotto, representing the passage of different pilgrims and honoring family members who have passed on. Crosses are left. Prayers are said. Tears wet dry ground.
At the roadside shrine to La Virgin Maria in northern New Mexico the half-acre site is covered with stones arranged in the shape of crosses. Dozens of such simple crosses, of varying sizes, cover the site.
Crosses at the La Veta shrine can be as small as a few inches or as large as railroad ties. Pilgrims leave offerings as they travel the Southwest. By leaving gifts they hopefully “vaya con Dios” or “go with God.”

The Virgin never leaves Hispanic roadside shrines dot the mystic West

At a shrine to La Virgin Maria just north of Abiquiu, N.M., folk artists created a stone grotto where the Virgin stands and is covered with gifts of necklaces. Other offerings are left at her feet, including small statues of Jesus, the Virgin of Guadalupe and votive candles.
A cross with a wreath of brambles is silhouetted against the sky at La Virgin Maria shrine north of Abiquiu, N.M. Nearby wooden crosses include names and dates of family members who have died. On one such cross a baby’s plastic pacifier is wired to the wood.
Wooden crosses at Hispanic roadside shrines receive all kinds of adornments and offerings, including this cross accented with yellow highway reflectors.
Multiple crosses lean against the stone grotto, representing the passage of different pilgrims and honoring family members who have passed on. Crosses are left. Prayers are said. Tears wet dry ground.
At the roadside shrine to La Virgin Maria in northern New Mexico the half-acre site is covered with stones arranged in the shape of crosses. Dozens of such simple crosses, of varying sizes, cover the site.
Crosses at the La Veta shrine can be as small as a few inches or as large as railroad ties. Pilgrims leave offerings as they travel the Southwest. By leaving gifts they hopefully “vaya con Dios” or “go with God.”
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