Court case centers on Native American children in foster care

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Court case centers on Native American children in foster care

Veronica, 3, a child at the center of an international adoption dispute at the time, smiles in the Cherokee Nation Jack Brown Center in 2013 in Tahlequah, Okla. A federal law that gives preference to Native American families in child welfare proceedings involving Native American children is facing a significant legal challenge. In 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the law didn’t apply in a South Carolina case involving Veronica because her Cherokee father was absent from part of her life.

Court case centers on Native American children in foster care

Veronica, 3, a child at the center of an international adoption dispute at the time, smiles in the Cherokee Nation Jack Brown Center in 2013 in Tahlequah, Okla. A federal law that gives preference to Native American families in child welfare proceedings involving Native American children is facing a significant legal challenge. In 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the law didn’t apply in a South Carolina case involving Veronica because her Cherokee father was absent from part of her life.

Court case centers on Native American children in foster care

Rusty and Summer Page, foster parents of Lexi, a then-6-year-old girl with Native American ancestry, who was removed from their home, are seen outside the California Court of Appeal in downtown Los Angeles in 2016. Lexi ultimately was placed with her father’s extended family in Utah.

Court case centers on Native American children in foster care

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton speaks at a news conference in 2017 in Dallas. Paxton is one of three state attorneys general challenging a federal law that gives preference to Native American families in child welfare proceedings involving Native American children.

Court case centers on Native American children in foster care

Sarah Kastelic, executive director of the National Indian Child Welfare Association, speaks at an annual gathering of the National Congress of American Indians on Feb. 13 in Washington. A federal law that gives preference to Native American families in foster care and adoption proceedings involving Native children is facing a significant legal challenge.