‘The toughest year’: Immigration dominated ’18

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‘The toughest year’: Immigration dominated ’18

Migrants run from tear gas launched by U.S. agents, amid photojournalists covering the Mexico-U.S. border, after a group of migrants got past Mexican police Nov. 25 at the Chaparral crossing in Tijuana, Mexico.
A father and his 3-year-old son are detained in the back of a U.S. Customs and Border Patrol vehicle on July 18 in San Luis, Ariz. The boy, his father and two siblings were arrested by a U.S. Border Patrol agent who spotted them crossing a canal along the international border.
Buena Ventura Martin Godinez, center, holds her son Pedro, left, as she is reunited with her daughter Janne, right, July 1 at Miami International Airport. Martin crossed the border into the United States from Mexico in May with her son, fleeing violence in Guatemala. Her husband crossed two weeks later with their 7-year-old daughter. All were caught by the Border Patrol, and were separated. “I came looking for a better life ... and everything went wrong,” she said.
A Guatemalan father and son, who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border illegally, are apprehended by a U.S. Border Patrol agent on June 28 in San Diego. Children torn from their parents, refugees turned away, tear gas fired on asylum-seekers, and a swath of the globe derided by the president in crude language. In a breathless 2018, they were just a handful of headlines on immigration, one of the year’s most dominant issues.
People look on from the Mexican side, left, as U.S. Border Patrol agents on the other side of the U.S. border wall in San Diego prepare for the arrival of hundreds of pro-migration protestors, seen from Tijuana, Mexico, on Dec. 10. A relentless stream of U.S. policy shifts in 2018 has amounted to one of the boldest attacks on all types of immigration that the country has ever seen.
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